Will the rippling disappear when the alloderm is fully incorporated?

I had a revision breast augmentation 9 weeks ago to fix rippling. The rippling was on the outer sides of my breasts. The implants were 350cc round silicone gel and placed under the muscle. I now have 330cc anatomical silicone gel implants and alloderm. The rippling on the outer sides is nearly gone but I now have rippling on the inner cleavage especially where the muscle ends.

Doctor Answers 5

Rippling after augmentation

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I have not had great luck using alloderm to treat rippling. When simply used as a filler it seems to conform to the ripples and doesn't obliterate them. If one is trying to use allograft to decrease rippling it has to be used to fashion a tight pocket such that you squeeze the ripples out of the implant. That being said it's less common to have ripples in the upper inner quadrant because the overlying pectoralis muscle hides most of them. perhaps the inner part of the muscle was dissected too far?


San Diego Plastic Surgeon

Will the rippling disappear when the alloderm is fully incorporated?

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If the rippling is currently present, its not likely to improve with time.  The textured surface implant is more likely to result in this issue.  Additional soft tissue reinforcement, either with Alloderm or Strattice (which would be more cost efficient) are potential solutions depending on how much of an issue this is for you.

Will the rippling disappear when the alloderm is fully incorporated?

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I am sorry to hear about your concerns after breast surgery. Depending on your level of concern regarding the breast implant rippling medially, it is possible that additional  surgery,  involving use of additional dermal matrix will be necessary.  Best wishes.

Rippling

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Rippling may very well be due to texturing of the implant surface, which is common with many anatomical implants.  I would discuss this with your surgeon.  Options may include switching to smooth implants, fat grafting, or possibly additional allografting to provide thicker coverage.

Time will tell

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If you are now developing medial pole rippling that is new you should discuss it with your surgeon. It suggests the tissues beneath the implants are thin and will need reinforcement like the other area recently corrected. Additionally high profile implants are less likely to produce this problem. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.