I get Malsama even though I cover and use sunblock. If I put sunblock under concealer would it stop sun and Melasma?

I live in a hot sunny part of Australia. I get Malasma from exposure to the sun even though I cover and use 50+ sunblock. If I use sunblock under a heavy concealer when swimming would it stop the mesasma? The Asians use white zinc, my sunblock was clear zinc 50+.

Doctor Answers 3

Sunscreen and melasma.

Yes, I know the Asians use white zinc, especially in Japan and Korea ( where ratings of SPF exceed 120) compared to Australia where the max. rating is regulated at 50. SPF plays the most important role, the use of sunscreens can only protect up to a mid UVA wavelength, with white zinc, the protection is higher. For swimming, I would suggest coating with thick zinc. I certainly do this when Im swimming in summer in Brisbane. The UV exposure is intense.As suggested, the combination of lasers, SPF, HQ and other factors can help with your melasma. I treat quite a few cases of melasma on a daily basis, and provided all factors are adhered to, the results are pretty good, considering our UV exposure in where I practice. All the best, Dr Davin Lim 

Brisbane Dermatologist
4.7 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Melasma treatments

Even though sun exposure is a big factor of melisma and SPF with Zinc is a great protector to slow down melasma, it is also caused by other factors such as hormones.  You may want to consult with your dermatologist to perhaps do some add-on treatments such as laser treatments and/or micropeels to help reduce the appearance of melasma.

David P. Melamed, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Melarase AM for sunblock

I would recommend Melarase AM, which contains four active sunblocks and skin lighteners. 


Dr. Karamanoukian

Los Angeles

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 93 reviews

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