Odds of nipples becoming more symmetrical? (photo)

So I'm a little worried about the assymmetry on my breasts. I'm currently 14 days post op. 5'8.5 130lbs.

Doctor Answers 13

Odds of nipples becoming more symmetrical after breast augmentation?

Please check your preoperative photograph to see if you have asymmetry of your nipples before surgery.  Breast implants can increase the asymmetry appearance.  You are still early in recovery and expected your breast implant and breasts to normalize over the next 3 months.  Always check with your plastic surgeon.

Nipple asymmetry after Breast augmentation

Thank you so much for your question. If someone has nipple asymmetry before surgery then it will still be present after surgery.  I'm sure if you review your before pictures you will find you had this difference before but did not notice it as most patients with similar irregularities. Breast implants do not change nipple asymmetry or cause it. But they do make patients look at their breast more. The problem is if you more symmetry with the nipples it would require lifting one nipple which will likely leave more asymmetry because of the scar. Not to mention the tension on the lifted scar would be greater causing that nipple to likely change shape again leading to worse asymmetry. The best would be to become ok with it as it is a normal variant that most people will not notice.

William J. Hedden, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 285 reviews

2 weeks post op, some advices:

Thanks for the question. 

In my practice, after performing a BA I recommend to my patients to limit the movement of the arms for two weeks. After that, you can move your arms taking care and always with common sense.  In this regard, it's not advisable to carry heavy weights to prevent the implant out of position, and allow the formation of the physiological capsule around the implant, also to avoid pain and breast swelling. 

Kind regards

Emmanuel Mallol Cotes, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 178 reviews

Breast asymmetry

You are very early in the healing process and have to give it time for the implants to settle. Implants do  magnify asymmetries.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Asymmetry after augmentation

14 days post op is too early to worry about minor asymmetries.  If you are very concerned, I would recommend calling your surgeon and letting them evaluate you.  Without seeing your photos preop, it is impossible to know if you had asymmetry before surgery.  


Best,

Breast augmentation question

You have what appears to be a very nice augmentation result. There is slight asymmetry of your nipples. This may change with additional healing. Try to be patient at this point. It takes six months or longer to realize your final results. Discuss your concerns with your surgeon.

Asymetry 14 days post op

Thank you for your questions and photograph.  My strong advice is to wait a full 4-6 months before considering a "final" result.  Please remember that some asymmetry is quite normal.  Best of luck.

Look at pre-op photos

Your nipples were likely asymmetric prior to augmentation, simply putting implants in will not correct this, your surgeon should have and likely did point this out to you during your consultation. You are also very fresh post-op, as the swelling goes down, the implants will settle and things will look better. Best of luck with your healing

Odds of nipples becoming more symmetrical

Thank you for your question. You are very early in healing and your breasts continue to change in the coming several weeks. It will be helpful to see pre op pictures to comment on nipples. Please follow instructions from your PS

Breasts heal and drop at different rates.

Thank you for your questions and photos!

It is clear from the pictures there is mild asymmetry with the left breast being lower.

I humbly request you to not be discouraged and know that you are not alone in feeling this. Large number of women experience differences in their breasts few days to few weeks after surgery and feel awful. After waiting for a few months, they finally get the results they were hoping for.

Implants initially sit high up because the chest muscles and surrounding breast tissues have not become accustomed to the implant resulting in tightness. You have to allow gravity to take effect, and overtime, natural tissue expansion will allow the implants to fall into place causing your breasts to appear more natural, softer, and rounder. Once that happens, the implant will sit directly behind the breast tissue in a natural 45:55 breast ratio (tear-drop shape), and the nipples will move up higher (and point up). Currently, there may be excessive upper pole fullness (> 55:45) in both sides, so in time, this will change.

Please note that it is not uncommon for breasts to heal and adapt to implants at different rates.

Also note that any asymmetry that existed in breasts or nipples before surgery will continue to exist as breast augmentation only works to increase size of the breasts.

You may have to wait 3-6 months for the final results. Since you are only 2 week into recovery, there is a lot of time for the “drop and fluff.”

With persistent inward and downward breast massaging, along with pole wraps, the breasts drop.

If the breasts appear too high and you are unhappy with cleavage gap even after 3-6 months, then at that point in time you may share your concerns with your surgeon and they should be able to fix the problem.

Patience is key!

Please continue to have regular follow-ups with your surgeon to make sure your breasts are healing beautifully. Their recovery instructions should take precedence over all else you read here as they are better informed about your surgical details.

Hope this helps.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.