Is rippling normal? Will it go away? (photos)

I am 5 days post-op 5'7 155lbs and was a 34A. I had 500cc silicone HP implants inserted and I am started to see rippling of my skin only left breast. Is this normal? Will it go away?

Doctor Answers 10

Is rippling normal? Will it go away? (photos)

Please consult with your surgeon. Your surgeon will be able to best answer this question. Good luck, please let us know how it goes.

- Dr. Constantino Mendieta

Skin rippling

Not much info to go on here.  I suspect that what I see are impressions from a snug bra, but I don't even know if you are wearing one. A call to your surgeon will be more helpful in getting this question answered. 

All the best. 

Rippling after BA

It is best to have your own PS examine you postoperatively and determine if everything is healing normally.  You are still very early in the healing process so the shape will change for several months.

Rippling after Breast Augmentation

     Breast augmentation is really a life-long investment.  Once you have breast implants, you are likely to love your result and you'll probably want to have breast implants for the rest of your life.  When I see patients in consultation we talk about the "short-term" result, about the first six months, and the long-term result, 5 years and beyond.  I want my patients to be happy with not only the short term result but perhaps more importantly the long-term result.  This is where the conversation about volumes and profiles of implants  becomes so important. Many women I see want to have a very noticeable change right away, but sometimes that may not be what's best over a lifetime.  Ripples are a big part of this conversation.  The less breast tissue a woman has, the more likely ripples will become noticeable along the sides and the bottoms of the breasts over time, particularly when larger volume implants (over 350 or 400 cc's) are placed.  Ripples usually are not apparent right away but become more evident as the swelling subsides over the first few months.  Over a few years the breast tissue thins out a bit, and ripples may become more easily felt and possibly even seen.  This is a hard discussion to have with a woman who comes into the office very excited about the prospect of undergoing breast augmentation and who has looked at maybe hundreds of pictures online.  She may think she wants 450 or 500 cc breast implants because of all of her research.  In my experience, implants over 350 or 400 cc's in women who have small overall frames and minimal breast tissue are likely to look great for the first few months, then develop more ripples long-term.  
    It is possible to develop visible ripples within the first five to ten days, but it's pretty uncommon.  Sometimes if the crease below the breast was lowered during the surgery to accommodate a larger implant, the lower breast tissue is thinned out and wrinkles in the breast implant may be noticeable right away.  More often, however, immediate changes in the lower breast may be caused by the combination of swelling present with the support garment worn.  The support garment presses on swollen tissue, leaving indentations.  This may resolve within about 5 weeks as the swelling goes away.

Kelly R. Kunkel, MD
Fort Worth Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Is rippling normal? Will it go away?

The photo you provided shows the lines of a post-operative bra or support garment on a slightly swollen breast.  If possible, loosen the top 2 hooks/snap/upper zipper to accommodate normal post-operative swelling.  Be sure to discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon.  Best wishes.

Jeanette Padgett, MD, FACS
Oklahoma City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Rippling 5 days postop

It appears from the photos you've shared that these are most likely skin impressions/imprints from some type of garment you've been wearing.  Its also a bit to early to see rippling especially in this location of the breast where it does not typically occur.  I would recommend seeing your surgeon if you are concerned.  Best wishes.

Michael J. Yoo, MD
Irvine Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Rippling after breast augmentation

Thank you for asking about your breast augmentation.

Without an exam, one can't be sure but the rippling in the photo looks like indentations in swollen skin - not implant rippling.
If it is from swelling, it will go away.

Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
Hope you found this answer helpful. Best wishes.

Is rippling normal? Will it go away?

I think that what you are seeing are "impression lines" from whatever brassiere or garment that you are wearing. At 5 days there is still a fair degree of swelling and most likely that is what is causing those transverse lines. True implant rippling or wrinkling if you were to have it would show with "lines" like spokes on a wheel, not side to side.  I would discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon. It may be simply that your compression bra or brassiere is too tight and causing those impression lines. Good luck!

Skin changes

From that one picture, it does not appear like rippling but more an impression or indentation from a tight fitting bra or garnment. If you are wearing one, see if you can loosen it up some for it doesn't leave a mark.
Otherwise, follow up with your surgeon.

Khashayar Mohebali, MD, FACS
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Rippling 5 Days After Surgery

It is way to early to determine anything about the appearance of your breast augmentation/implants.  It's not abnormal to have this appearance, which does occur in some cases this early.  I would wait at least four months to judge any of the result of your breast augmentation.  There will be several changes that occur by then, including filling out of your lower breast pole.  and definition of the implant laterally will be more set.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.