Can non-surgical nose procedures lift your tip? (photos)

I have a baby bump on my nose and if it were to he filled in, my nose would be rounded completely, like one big bump instead of straight. So I'm wondering if the tip of my nose can be slightly lifted higher. Thanks!

Doctor Answers 3

Nonsurgical Nose Jobs Can Lift Drooping Nasal Tips & Help To Taper Noses

If you examine the before and after photos in the sidebar to this column of one of my patients who had a nonsurgical nose job performed, you will see that not only was the prominent bump on the bridge of his nose straightened, but the drooping tip elevated and the nose made to appear more tapered. So, the short answer to your question is that nonsurgical nose jobs using volumizing fillers can achieve these objectives.  Be sure to seek consultation and treatment by a board certified aesthetic physician with expertise and experience in performing nonsurgical rhinoplasty and of course ask to see his/her before and after photos before agreeing to proceed. Best of luck to you. 


New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Nasal Tip Procedures

Fillers cannot lift the tip of the nose, sometimes botox can but honestly, the best treatment is surgical contouring.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 167 reviews

Can nonsurgical nose procedures lift your tip?

No, nonsurgical procedures cannot lift the tip. Placement of fillers in the nose is not FDA approved, is temporary, and can have significant complications. To make changes to the nose such as lifting the tip and shaving down dorsal hump requires a surgical rhinoplasty. For many before-and-after examples of noses similar to your own, please see the video and the link below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.