Will they drop evenly despite the fact the incisions are not both in the crease? (Surgery date 8/30) (Photos)

I know implants often drop at different rates and I expected as much. I am worried because of the location of the incision on each breast. It seems that the right one that has dropped lower has a higher incision site resting on the bottom of the breast. The left one sits much higher and the incision site is in the crease. Will the left implant drop below the incision site to match the other? Is there anything I can do to fix this?

Doctor Answers 7

Breast Implants/Breast Augmentation/Anatomic Gummy Bear Implants/ Silicone Implants/Breast Implant Revision Surgery

I appreciate your question.

Right now, you are early on in the post op recovery period. It will take 3-6 months for you to feel comfortable having implants in your body and for them to settle. This time allows for you to physically and psychologically adapt to your new body image. There are many variables that contribute to a breast augmentation's final result. Preop size and shape, IMF location, location of the implants and type of implant. Patients heal at different rates and each breast will sometimes heal at a different rate. Rest, relax, recover and heal. Express your concerns to your surgeon so he/she can examine you. Then reassess final result at 6 months.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative breast surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon



Will they drop evenly despite the fact the incisions are not both in the crease?

Remember that it can take a good 4-6 months to allow all of the swelling to resolve and to let the implants drop and settle some. If you still feel they are asymmetrical after that time, best to have a candid discussion with your operating surgeon. Good luck!!

Implant position

It is too early in the game to know exactly how low the implants will drop as they heal. Best to be patient with the results.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

It is too early

You are at early stages of healing and time will till if you need further surgery to correct the implant position. Please continue to see your surgeon and wait at least 3 months for final results. It looks like that your right implant is low and make require pocket revision if not better in 3 months. 

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 110 reviews

Your concerns are justified.

it is very early after your surgery. It is best that you get back to see your plastic surgeon. Early contracture can sometimes cause upward displacement. A bandeau is often very helpful in the first few weeks to help equalize implant malppsition. Best of luck to you and hopefully they will even our for you.

Ram Kalus, MD
Mount Pleasant Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Will they drop evenly despite the fact the incisions are not both in the crease? (Surgery date 8/30)

Discuss these questions with your surgeon, as well as the incision site.  You are very early in the surgery, and it will take several weeks to see the final result.  

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Asymmetry after surgery

Congratulations on your recent surgery. You are very early after your surgery and your breasts will change and settle a lot. Discuss all of your concerns with your plastic surgeon as only he/she knows why the incisions are in different positions. The most common reason for this is anatomical differences that existed prior to surgery. It is too early to determine what your final results will be but I think you have an excellent start. Good luck!

Jennifer Boll, MD
Tempe Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.