Do you tell your Breast Augmentation patient to obtain mammography baseline?

I was reading one of the FDA breast implant safety summaries, which suggested that pre-op and post op mammography being taken to establish a baseline for future mammography interpretation. I knew that breast implant will interfere with mammography reading and that the mammography procedure will increase the likelihood of implant rupture. However, the plastic surgeons that I met never mentioned the suggestion of baseline mammography. Why is that? Is it not important?

Doctor Answers 12

Do you need a baseline mammogram before implant surgery?

 Excellent question. In general, the need for mammography before surgery is on a case-by-case basis. Very young women (20-35) with no history of breast masses or family history of cancer will not need a mammogram before surgery. Women close to the age of 40, women with prior abnormal mammogram, or women with a significant family history of breast diseases would likely need a mammogram before surgery as a baseline. Finally, a woman over 40 years old who has had a previous mammogram, but none in the last several years, would also require a mammogram just as a baseline exam. Hope this helps to answer your question. 


Jacksonville Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Pre-Op Mammography

Dear cocoaaddict:

     

Thank you for your question.  Depending on your specific situation it may be best to obtain a baseline mammogram prior to surgery.  In cases of women pursuing surgery that are 40 years of age and older or who have a significant family history of breast cancer we recommend pre-op mammography.  With current mammography techniques, implants do not significantly impact visualization or increase the rate of implant rupture. Please discuss this with your surgeon. Good luck and I hope this helps!

 

Do you tell your BA patients to obtain mammography baseline?

Thank you for sharing your excellent question.  Depending on your specific situation it may be best to obtain a baseline mammogram prior to surgery.  This is usually in cases of women pursuing surgery that are 40 years of age and older or who have a significant family history of breast cancer.  With current mammography images, implants do not significantly impact the ability for images to be read or implant rupture.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Mammography and BA surgery

Great question.This topic is managed differently and will vary from surgeon to surgeon, and will be patient specific. I usually recommend (but not require) for patients to have a baseline mammogram prior to BA surgery if they are older than 35 years of age for future comparison. There is some great information on the American Cancer Society website as far as their recommendations, and they recommend for women aged 40-44, to start annual breast cancer screening with mammograms if they want. For those over 45 to 54 years of age, mammograms are recommended every year. Those that are younger but have a family history of breast CA and additional risk factors should have a screening mammogram and an MRI at 30. Mammography will not increase or cause breast implants to rupture. I hope this helps.


Benjamin J. Cousins MD

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Benjamin J. Cousins, MD
Miami Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Mammography and Breast Augmentation

I believe that you have been mislead regarding breast augmentation and mammography. Since the American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammography for all women beginning at age 40, it is a good idea to get a baseline mammogram if you are 38 or older and planning breast augmentation. Mammography DOES NOT increase the chances of implant rupture!  Please confirm my assertions with your medical doctor and plastic surgeon. Best of luck!

Robert M. Tornambe, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breast augmentation implant check with mammography and or MRI

I have always followed the ACS guidelines of first mammography at age 35 then 40 the every other year till 50 years of age unless you are high risk. Also any silicone implant patient I recommend an MRI for best analysis of the implant and breast tissue. Mammography will not break an implant, a technician may torture some patients, best to go to a center that is sensitive to your needs. Good luck...

Larry Weinstein, MD
Morristown Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Preoperative mammogram

Depending  on patient's risk factors and age  it is a good idea to obtain a preoperative mammogram to rule out any suspicious lesions. In my own practice I use the age of 40 if they have not already had a mammogram.  Implants placed below the muscle allow for better visualization of the breast tissue during  a mammogram.  

Gerald L. Yospur, MD
Mesa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Do you tell your Breast Augmentation patient to obtain mammography baseline?

If under 21 years of age very hard to obtain a mammogram.If you are so concerned than see your PMD to GYN to order a baseline mammogram...

Do you tell your Breast Augmentation patient to obtain mammography baseline?

Recommendations for mammography prior to surgery will vary from one practice to another.

I would suggest you follow the radiologists' recommendation in regard to mammography. Assuming you are  40 years of age or older mammogram prior to surgery will be helpful. If you are younger than 40,  then it may or may not be indicated depending on your specic situation (personal/family history of breast cancer and/or  specific concerns on physical examination).  If in doubt, your primary care and/or Gyn physician's  recommendations will be helpful.  I hope this helps.

Depends on your age

Depends on your age and risk factors.  Having said that, mammography technology has drastically improved so breasts implants really do not interfere with readings.

Best Wishes,

Nana Mizuguchi, MD

Nana N. Mizuguchi, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

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