Would there be a change on my breast if I lose 25-30lbs?

I'm getting breast implants and I haven't reached my weight goal but I'm still working on it. would there be a change on my breast if I loose 25-30lbs?

Doctor Answers 9

Breast size changes

It is hard to determine what, if any, change weight loss will have on your breast size.  In general, if you have noticed changes to your breast size with previous weight loss/gain then you can expect that you will notice a difference.  The most predictable result will come if your weight is stable and you are at your goal weight.

Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Change of breast size with weight loss

Thank you for your question. If you tend to gain/lose breast size with weight gain/loss, you may notice a difference. The implants add volume to the breast. If you lose natural volume with weight loss, you will therefore lose volume in the breasts. If you are planning on losing the weight after breast augmentation surgery, lean toward a larger implant.

I hope this helps.

- Dr. Bryson Richards


Loosing weight can affect the volume of your breasts but it is hard to guess to what degree. It is better to reach your goal weight prior to surgery day.

Ron Hazani, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills General Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 254 reviews

Weight loss and plastic surgery

Weight should be stable before any type of lifting surgery.  Gains or losses in weight prior to or after surgery will generate less than perfect results because tissues need to catch up.  Thus, the safe rule is 6 months of stable weight. 

Tim Neavin, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Breast size after weight loss

Its hard to predict how that much weight will change the volume of your breast.  Everyone is different. However, I do recommend to have a stable weight for at least 3 months before undergoing surgery to optimize your results.

Khashayar Mohebali, MD, FACS
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Weight loss

I generally like to see a stable weight for 6 months before surgery for optimal results.  Weight changes can certainly change the result.

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Would there be a change on my breast if I lose 25-30lbs?

Most women know if they gain or lose weight if their breast size will change.  If yours does change with weight gain or loss then your bra size will change.  25 - 30 lbs is a fair amount of weight.

I recommend that my patients get close to or reach their comfortable goal weight before surgery so that you will reach the desired bra and cup size.

Best of luck.

Ralph R. Garramone, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Would there be a change on my breast if I lose 25-30lbs?

Thank you for the question. It is difficult to predict how a specific young lady's breasts will change with weight loss; how the breasts were affected historically with weight loss may be  the best indication how you will do.
Generally speaking, significant weight loss can lead to some change in breast tissue (and/or nipple/areola) position;  this “sagging” is called breast ptosis medically.
Sometimes, patients who lose weight will have a smaller amount of breast/soft tissue coverage overlying the breast implants; this change in breast anatomy may lead to a greater degree of breast implant palpability and/or rippling.  In these cases, the breasts may also appear smaller.
Therefore, generally speaking, it is in patient's best interest to achieve a long-term stable weight prior to undergoing elective breast surgery.
I hope this, and the attached link, help.

Define your goals

There may be a change in the breast shape and volume with that kind of weight loss.  It may be best to put off the surgery until you have reached your goal.  If you don't think hat you will lose the weight anytime soon and you want the augmentation, that would be fine as well.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.