How long will it take to develop a botox inhibitor?

Weeks or months with a droopy eye is a major blow. How many years it will take to develope, test and market a potential inhibitor? Because I for one simply cannot take the risk of having botox injected in the upper third of my face. Not with what I'm going through now. And with what I read it can happen even with the best doctors. It's basically Russian roulette.

Doctor Answers 7

Botox reversal agent?

The problem is that Botox is rapidly incorporated into the nerve - minutes to hours. It then "kills" the nerve endings so the muscle that it is attached to won't contract. New nerve endings then grow and the movement returns. There is no pathway to reverse it unless it is done immediately to prevent the absorption of the Botox. I believe there is a product out there for people who are overdosed but as I said, it needs to be administered very rapidly. It would be done before the "effects" of the Botox were noticeable. Drooping of the eyelid from Botox is extremely rare in experienced hands, eyebrow ptosis is somewhat more frequent. 


Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Botox Inhibitor

The research is still on going for a Botox inhibitor and there is no anticipated date of release.  Botox is a fabulous injection but there is always a risk of side effects no matter how small with any injection.  Best, Dr. Green

Droopy Eyelids after Botox

Thank you for your question Fifienne. Botox is a purified protein used to address wrinkles associated with facial expression. A rare side effect is droopy eyelids. This occurs if the Botox moves to the muscles which raise the upper eyelid. Such a side effect is temporary and treatable. Droopy eyelids usually resolve in 2-4 weeks, but sometimes it could take 3-4 months. This can be treated with apraclonidine 0.5% ophthalmic solution 2-3 drops per eye 2-3 times per day. Comparing Botox to Russian roulette is like comparing apples and oranges. Death from Russian roulette is different from temporary droopy eyelids after Botox. With any treatment there are risks. It is important to understand the risks, benefits, and alternatives of any treatment before undergoing it. In our office all patients undergoing any treatment are required to sign an informed consent prior to the treatment. The signature indicates that they understand the risks and are willing to take the risks associated with the treatment. Sometimes patients are not willing to take the risk and they do not undergo the treatment. I am not aware of any ongoing research to find an antidote or inhibitor for Botox. Please follow up with your doctor for specific recommendations. Good luck!

Alex Eshaghian, MD, PhD
Encino Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Articles don't always tell the whole story

While you might read about Botox inhibitors, these are really just in the experimental phase and only have theoretical applications. 

Matthew Brackman, MD
Springfield Bariatric Surgeon

Botox risks

I doubt very much that a Botox inhibitor will ever be marketed and available for retail use as it has many serious implication. Given your apprehension about Botox, I strongly recommend you consult a facial plastic surgeon about surgical options to achieve your cosmetic goal.

Edwin Ishoo, MD
Cambridge Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Have a good medical check

A medical check  of your eyes and brow area may reveal some underlying anatomy or muscular problem that is making you more at risk for a droop.
Sometimes patients have pre-existing weak eyelids (ptosis) or brows that needs altered Botox doses.
Best wishes.

Anti Botox ?


Good idea. As always, if people donate for medical research or write to their Congressman to support NIH research, a lot of medical problems can be solved quicker than later.

Best
Dr Karamanoukian
#RealSelf100 Member

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.