Treatment for lax skin under chin? Age 20 (Photo)

Hello! Not sure what this is called or what is wrong, but within the year I've developed a looseness under my chin that cause the look of jowls and often times a thin triangle of skin that looks incredibly stretched out. I've deduced that it isn't fat (not in my genes), and the skin feels very delicate and thin there. When I pose my head or neck it looks really skeletal and weird. Would botox help keep a tight contour? What is this called?

Doctor Answers 13

Loose skin

Unless there is fat under the chin that might respond to Kybella, we find that treatment with a skin tightening laser such as Thermage tends to work very nicely, especially in younger people.

Beforehand, I would definitely seek a consultation with a qualified physician.


San Diego Physician

Many options..

From the photos it looks like you just need skin tightening and for this you have two options....surgical neck lift or non surgical skin tightening with RF technology (Profound, InMode Fracture and etc).  You need to see a plastic surgeon to examine you and discuss all your options (surgical and non surgical).  Make sure to have the plastic surgeon show you before/after photos of each of the options....

Andre Aboolian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Lax Skin Under the Chin

This is one of the most common problems that patients present in the office.  i would recommend a combination of Botox and Thermage to tighten up the skin under the neck.  Botox can be injected and lifted this area.  Thermage will build collagen and help produce new collagen and tighten and lift this area.  Best, Dr. Green

The Nefertiti Lift With Botox & Skin Boosters With Fillers Can Help Tighten A Loose Neck

A close up frontal view of the neck would have been extremely helpful, along with an additional frontal view of the neck while gritting the teeth. However, from what I can see, the minimal laxity of the upper neck may be helped by the use of  special Botox injection technique, known as the "Nefertiti Lift," named after King Tut's step mother whose tight, chiseled jawline has remained the ideal of feminine beauty since antiquity. Droplets of Botox are placed within the ropey cords in the neck and along certain areas of the jawline to weaken slighly the downward pull of the broad, sheetlike muscle, known as the platysma, that stretches from the chest to the jawline, which is responsible for the development of the undesirable ropey neck cords.  By weakening slightly the downward pull of the platysma,  the upward pulling muscles in the face above are essentially given a competitive advantage and are able to pull upward and tighten both the jawline and upper neck below. This treatment alone may provide the results you desire. If further tightening of the neck is still required, the use of a filler, such as Restylane Skin Boosters or Belotero Balance, injected very superficially may be used to further tighten it. Via a direct biostimulatory effect, the presence of the filler within the skin can also stimulate the production of new, native collagen and elastic fiber synthesis (neocollagenesis, neoelastogenesis) to additionally stretch and tighten the skin. Since excess fat appears to play no part here, Kybella would be of little value. My experience with expensive fraxel and radiofrequency device treatments is that they are much more  marketing hype than hard science. So exercise appropriate caution and do your due diligence when considering these. Make sure you consult with a board certified aesthetic physician with experience and expertise in nonsurgical neck rejuvenation and request to see his/her before and after photos before agreeing to proceed. Best of luck.

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Skin Damage Solutions--lasers, microneedling/prp, ultherapy, kybella

Ultherapy and/or Kybella in combination with lasers or RF, Sculptra for collagen building, and microneedling/prp would all give improvement. I recommend getting a formal evaluation with a cosmetic dermatologist. Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 167 reviews

Best option for neck skin laxity?

Hello cerealexperiments,

Thank you for sharing your question and photos. Based on what you have told us and we can see liposuction, Botox or Kybella will not be of much assistance. Focus on non-invasive treatments such as Ultherapy, Chemical Peels, Micro needling with PRP, RF treatments or Lasers to help achieve your desired outcome. 

Paul Pietro, MD
Greenville Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Treatment for lax skin under chin? Age 20

Thank you for sharing your question and photographs.  Botox and liposuction are definitely not the correct option for you and I would be in favor of either a laser or chemical peel treatment to obtain some skin tightening effect.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Neck Skin laxity

Hello!

You definitely do not need liposuction. I would consider an external-approach treatment such as laser resurfacing or microneedling with PRP. The best is to visit with your doctor and run through multiple options. I don't do ultherapy but hear that it could be promising.

best of luck,

Treatment for lax skin under chin? Age 20

A neck lift would correct this but you are too young. I would try non surgical methods such a Ultherapy. You obviously do not need liposuction-don't even think about it.

Loose skin under the chin

Thank you for your question cerrealexperiments. Botox is a purified protein used to address wrinkles associated with facial expression. For loose skin under the chin options include skin tightening, Ultherapy, radiofrequency, fractional CO2 or Erbium (YAG or YSGG) laser, or surgery. Please consult with a doctor for specific recommendations. Good luck!

Alex Eshaghian, MD, PhD
Encino Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.