I'm 61 and diabetic. Am I a good candidate for a tummy tuck?

Doctor Answers 8

Diabetes and abdominoplasty.

A patient's general health is always assessed before undergoing surgery.  There are many risk factors that increase the possiblity of complications.

If diabetes is your only risk factor, you will probably heal without major complications.  However, you would need to have medical clearance from your primary care physician and your diabetes would need to be under optimal control perioperatively.


Knoxville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Proper preoperative evalutation

Great question! Diabetes is not a contraindication for undergoing tummy tuck surgery. It is important to have a thorough preoperative evaluation before undergoing surgery, including making sure your blood glucose is well controlled, and confirming that your heart and lungs are healthy. This is best done by your primary care doctor. Poorly controlled diabetes can put patients at risk for infections and poor wound healing, which would negatively affect your final result. Be sure and choose a board certified plastic surgeon who acknowledges this before proceeding. Best of luck!

Diabetes and Tummy Tuck

Thanks for sharing your question, if your diabetes is controlled and your family doctor gives you a green light, you are ready to go. You need to be healthy to undergo any elective surgery. Please have a virtual (Skype) or in person consultation so you can discuss thoroughly your concerns, options and expectations, Good luck in your PS Surgery!
Respectfully,

Dr. Jaime Campos-Leon

Jaime Campos Leon, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 243 reviews

Diabetes and tummy tuck

As long as your diabetes is well controlled and you have no other medical problems, you should able to have a tummy tuck.  Your plastic surgeon will most likely request a medical clearance from your primary care physican to make sure you are a good candidate for elective surgery.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Surgery and diabetes

Thank you for your question.  There are many factors that would determine if you are a good candidate.  The first step may be for you to check with your physician who manages your diabetes and tell them you are considering a tummy tuck and see what they say.  If they think you would be an acceptable candidate, then schedule an appointment with a board-certified PS with lost of tummy tuck experience.  Best wishes!

I'm 61 and diabetic. Am I a good candidate for a tummy tuck?

If you are otherwise healthy and have well controlled blood sugars, you may be a good candidate for tummy tuck. I would search for the board certified plastic surgeon who you feel is most likely to give you the best results and who performs hundreds of these procedures each year. I would look at patient reviews as well as before and after photos on that surgeon's website.


Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Candidate for a tummy tuck

Whether not depends on examination. Specifically for you, your diabetes must be well-controlled. Your best answers will come from it in person consultation with several board-certified plastic surgeons. 

Diabetes and Tummy Tuck

This really is impossible to answer in this forum.  There are many factors to consider when determining if someone is a good candidate for a cosmetic procedure.  The pertinent questions would be your medical history, the overall quality of your health, the severity of your diabetes, smoking status, your physical exam and specifically your abdominal exam, body-mass index, etc.  It would certainly be appropriate to seek consultations with board certified plastic surgeons who can give you informed opinions about the safety of this procedure for you.

Richard Kofkoff, MD, FACS
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 73 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.