Double eyelid surgery and aging. Any suggestions?

If a 19 year old Asian girl gets the double eyelid surgery, what happens when she ages? Would the scar be very obvious when one is at her 50s or 60s/70s?

Doctor Answers 6

Early age Asian eyelid surgery

it's unlikely having Asian eyelid surgery at a young age will cause issues later in life.  Patients also tend to touch up their surgery as they age.  Take your time though.  Results 25 are the same as they are at 19.  Get a number of consults with a surgeon who performs Asian eyelid surgery regularly before proceeding.

Chase Lay MD


Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Double eyelid surgery and aging

Hi Lemonnn,Age of 19 is great time to consider double eyelid surgery. More than 2/3 of my asian eyelid surgery patients come in for surgery before reaching their mid-20s. You can get better outcome with double eyelid surgery when you do the surgery before the aging starts taking place on the eyelid area. With that said, double eyelid surgery doesn't stop the ageing process and the patient will still have changes to their eye as they age. But scars do fade overtime. Many of my patient tell me it's very difficult to see the scar after 6months to a year.  You should go see experienced board certified plastic surgeon to give you in person consultation. 
Best of luck,

Peter Newen, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Doulbe eyelid surgery and aging

Double eyelid surgery is a very effective means of improving upper eyelid contour and creating a natural supratarsal crease. Please see example below.

Arian Mowlavi, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Double eyelid surgery and ageing

Hi there. Greetings from the UK! Nothing really abnormal happens. An incisional technique is more likely to be permanent  over a sutural technique; so with time the crease formed by something like a DST method may start to disappear. Double eyelid surgery doesn't stop the ageing process and the patient will still get elongation of the eyelid fold (dermatochalasis) like every other ageing patient. One can then perform a rejuvenation blepharoplasty then to compensate if the patient wants using the same surgical crease as before. But no, the scar from the initial skin crease formation surgery ( which is essentially what double eyelid surgery is) does not increase in prominence with age. bw David

David Cheung, MBChB, Bsc(Hons), FRCOphth
Birmingham Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Double eyelid surgery and aging

Performing surgery while thinking about the long term outcome is one of the challenges I enjoy. I prefer to counsel my patients about the result that will be seen over decades rather than the next 6 months to 1 year.
Regarding double eyelid surgery, the appearance of scars will generally become less noticeable. Most well-healed scars generally fade over time as long as there is not too much tension or traction on it. Secondly, the surgery does not stop time, so eyelid skin will become loose and hang over the scar, hiding it from view. 
Double eyelid surgery is not performed by every plastic surgeon, so I recommend seeing a specialist who can go over your particular anatomy and the appropriate treatment for a safe and happy outcome. 

Victor Chung, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

This is from Girin Plastic Surgery.

If you do incision operation, there would be scar's left on your eyelid.
Don't worry about the scar when you are aged; because this scar remains dark when you just had surgery done, but will be fade out as time goes by.
In other hand, if you do non-incision operation, there wouldn't be scar left.
You need to figure out which operation is good match for you. Thank you.

Hoon Song, MD
South Korea Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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