I am 55 years old, weigh approx. 220 lbs at 5'5". I have an umbilical hernia - am I a candidate for tummy tuck?

I had a C-section in my late 20 s. I have had a pannis tummy since that day of the C-section. I have high blood pressure controlled by Lisinopril 10 mg daily, and occasional kidney stones which may be caused by cystineuria , Other than a small benign cyst of my ovary I am in good health. I have an umbilical hernia, which I hope to have corrected.

Doctor Answers 10

Tummy Tuck Candidate

If there are no health or medical reasons that would make you a significant surgical risk, then it would be possible for you to have a tummy tuck (abdominoplasty). This procedure is, however, not a substitute for dieting or exercise and one cannot expect to lose any real, measurable weight from the surgery alone. Overall you will do much better in terms of surgical risk, high blood pressure and surgical result if you lose weight before surgery. The matter of your umbilical hernia can certainly be repaired at the time of surgery.

For the best results seek the consultation of a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. They have a website listing all the certified plastic surgeons. Members of the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery will all be board certified in plastic surgery and have demonstrated an interest and special skill in cosmetic plastic surgery as well.

For more information about tummy tuck please see the web link below. Best of luck!


Nashville Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Tummy tuck and umbilical hernia

Hi, BredaKay1
Thanks for your question.
Umbilical hernia can be repaired at the time of tummy tuck.
However, your cosmetic result of tummy tuck would be better if you lose weight.  For surgical and post-surgical complication, it would be better if your BMI is less than 30.
Once your reach your stable, goal weight, please consult a board-certified plastic surgeon.
Best regards.

I have an umbilical hernia - am I a candidate for tummy tuck?

Probably, yes, the recommended procedure for you would be a Tummy Tuck, but, still, is better to have a consultation with your preferred surgeon to discuss that. I it happens to be that you're eligible for Tummy Tuck, the hernia can be repaired in that same surgery. 
I hope this answer was helpful. 

Yily De Los Santos, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 1,632 reviews

Umbilical Hernia and Tummy Tuck

Only a personal examination and conversation can determine if you are an appropriate candidate for a tummy tuck.  With respect to the umbilical hernia, this is commonly repaired during a tummy tuck procedure.  This may be done by your plastic surgeon or a general surgeon working along with the plastic surgeon.  It is important to be aware of potential healing problems caused by damage to the blood supply to the navel so be certain to speak with your surgeon about this issue.

I am 55 years old, weigh approx. 220 lbs at 5'5". I have an umbilical hernia - am I a candidate for tummy tuck?

Thank you for the question. Generally speaking, it is always best to achieve long-term stable weight prior to proceeding with body contouring surgery. Doing so, will increase the safety of the operation, will likely improve the outcome of the operation, and will decrease chances that additional surgery will become necessary subsequently.

In my practice, I do not ask specific patients to achieve a specific weight prior to proceeding with tummy tuck surgery. I simply ask patients to achieve a long-term stable weight where he/she feels comfortable and does not expect significant fluctuation postoperatively.   When the time is right, seeking consultation with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons will be your next/best step. Best wishes.

Tummy tuck with Umbilical Hernia Repair?

Hi BrendaKay1

I am glad you are in such good health.  My big concern is your weight.  By my formula, you have a BMI of 36.6 kg/m2.  Your wight category is "Obese Class 2".  Your wight range should be from 111lbs to 150 lbs to be in the "normal weight" range.

I wouldn't rule out a tummy tuck, but I would be very unlikely to perform it on you.  The combination of hypertension and obesity greatly increases risks.

I would discuss this frankly with an experienced ps.  A lot will also depend on your physical exam.

Another option to consider is a panniculectomy.

All the best.

Se

Schedule a consultation

Yes, it is quite common to have an umbilical hernia corrected during a tummy tuck procedure. I would suggest that you schedule a consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon in your area (link below) who can assess your in person, getting your full medical history, and, together, you can decide if surgery is the right option for you. Best, Dr. Nazarian

Sheila S. Nazarian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

I have an umbilical hernia - am I a candidate for tummy tuck.

Umbilical hernias are very common after pregnancy and frequently repaired during a tummy tuck procedure. An office consultation and understanding of the procedure will help you decide if tummy tuck is right for you.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Tummy Tuck Candidate?

An in person exam, a review of your medical history and then learning what your expectations are would be the first step. In general though, it sounds like you are a candidate as long as your BP is well controlled and your expectations are realistic.

Tummy tuck expectations

Thank you for your question. You would need to see a plastic surgeon in person to really determine whether or not you are a candidate. However, judging simply by your BMI, you would be a better candidate for what is called "panniculectomy." This is simply removing the excess, overhanging skin in your lower abdomen. That might spark the ability to diet & exercise. A true tummy tuck could then be considered once you were able to lose more weight. Best wishes.

Paul J. Leahy, MD
Leawood Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.