Revision Rhinoplasty, Revision Septoplasty (Photo)

I need a hero, who is willing to help me get my life back. I refuse to believe that there is no one willing to help me reverse this. Please consider being that person. In May 2015, I had a septoplasty, turbinectomy & a closed rhinoplasty to control an "external nasal deformity." Now, I have an open roof deformity, an inverted V, a step off deformity, and a clefted columella. My septum is S-shaped. Not only can I not breathe through my nose, I cannot speak with volume. Can this ever be corrected?

Doctor Answers 6

Revision rhinoplasty

There are many excellent surgeons who can help you with a revision of your rhinoplasty.  The open roof deformity, the inverted V deformity can be treated with help of osteotomies and cartilaginous grafts.  The hardest area to treat is a columellar cleft.  However, it can be significantly improved.  You should meet two surgeons who perform revision Rhinoplasties and make your decision. 
Regards
Dr. J


Bedminster Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 97 reviews

Revision rhinoplasty requires careful analysis and planning

From your picture, it does appear that you have an open roof deformity. In many cases this can be corrected with osteotomies (breaking the nose) but may also require other maneuvers such as spreader grafts. 

The tip is bulbous and may require revision of tip sutures, a tip graft, and other maneuvers. 

These findings are not unusual in revision rhinoplasty. Find a plastic surgeon with an interest in, and experience with, revision rhinoplasty. 

Good luck. 

Steven Goldman, MD
Cleveland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 118 reviews

Revision Rhinoplasty

Some of the most difficult cases in my field are revision rhinoplasties -- but they are often the most rewarding.  This is because of the tremendous disappointment that patients feel after having hoped to look better with plastic surgery, but their experiences at other offices have left them with results that are not an improvement.  Most often in my revision rhinoplasty patients, this disappointment can be debilitating.  I would like to suggest that you not only seek a board-certified plastic surgeon with years of experience with revision rhinoplasty, but that your gesture of looking for help be regarded (by you) as a step in the right direction in the goal of looking better.  You are not unattractive with your nose as it is, but I do see what you do, and your summation of your situation regarding the physical effects of your prior rhinoplasty are existent, yet correctable. 

Secondary surgery`

Forget imaging -- that will only give you false hopes -- you need to see a skilled rhinoplastic surgeon who can tackle a difficult problem.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Revision Rhinoplasty

Hi,

It appears that you have many cosmetic and functional issues that need to be resolved. The best way to approach this is to have several consultation with computer imaging so that you could see what your results could potentially look like. The functional aspect, such as breathing, need a direct physical exam to figure out the issues and an appropriate surgical plan.

Best,

Dr.S.

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 266 reviews

Nasal shape and breathing issues after rhinoplasty

You have two difficult problems, possibly three!
1) Nasal shape. A revision rhinoplasty would be recommended. I use an open technique for rhinoplasty and revision rhinoplasty. Why?  Because both are very difficult to do well consistenly. 
2) Breathing. An exam of your septum would be the first step. An exam of your sinuses would also be helpful. 
3) Speaking volume. This needs to evaluated in the context of your breathing. 
You may need both a specialist to improve the shape of your nose and another specialist to improve your breathing and speaking volume. 
Good luck!

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.