The Top 9 of '09 in the World of Plastic Surgery

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  1. Due to an economic downturn, the financial crisis caused many to cut back on discretionary spending, including plastic surgery and non-surgical aesthetic enhancement.
     
  2. BOTOX Cosmetic celebrated their 7 year anniversary since FDA approval for cosmetic use and this month marks 20 years since FDA approval for treatment of strabismus (cross-eyed condition) and eyelid muscle spasm.
     
  3. In May, the FDA approved Dysport for use in the U.S. Like BOTOX, Dysport contains Botulinum Toxin A and works similarly to temporarily weaken or paralyze muscles to treat wrinkles caused by muscle contraction. 
     
  4. In July, the FDA approved a method of mixing Radiesse with lidocaine to minimize the discomfort of Radiesse injections. 
     
  5. Sculptra Aesthetic garnered FDA approval in August. Used for years to treat facial fat loss in patients with HIV, it is an excellent option for those wanting to add more fullness to their faces. 
     
  6. Adding to the list of FDA approvals in 2009, Latisse was launched by Allergan. Latisse miraculously produces noticeably longer, thicker, darker eyelashes in 6-8 weeks. Look for Latisse to be heavily marketed in 2010. 
     
  7. In October, the Donda West law was signed by California Governor Schwarzenegger prohibiting elective cosmetic surgery on a patient unless, prior to surgery, the patient has received a physical examination and clearance for surgery. 
     
  8. Evolence, a collagen based filler, made its quiet disappearance in December, succumbing to the popularity of hyaluronic acid fillers such as Restylane and Juvederm. Evolence still remains a good option for patients in which Restylane or Juvederm casts a noticeable blue hue.
     
  9. The Senate proposed a 5% tax on all cosmetic surgery to help pay for the new health care reform. Thanks to lobbying by Plastic Surgery organizations and the makers of Botox, Juvederm, and Restylane, as well as a grassroots campaign by many of you, the tax was removed from the bill and a 10% tax on indoor tanning was approved instead.
Article by
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon