Selfie Trend Leads to Increased Rhinoplasty Surgeries

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Are there more nose jobs being requested because of the selfie craze?

Do you remember the first time you ever heard your own voice on a recording? There may be the rare individual who did not have a negative reaction, but the response from most of the rest of us was some version of “I don’t sound like that!”, quickly followed by a somewhat desperate plea of “Do I?” Other than recording our voicemail message, there are not a lot of occasions where we hear how we sound. Consequently, while we may not be pleased, the quality of our voice is not something that demands a lot of our attention. The same cannot not be said of our appearance!

With the introduction of digital photography, which included not only an exponential increase in the number of photos we take, but also the ability to instantly zoom in, our own image has been thrust center stage. Fast forward to the current selfie phenomena, and it’s not much of a stretch to label it an obsession for many. This is especially true because the intended destination of that facial close-up shot is Facebook, Instagram or any number of other social media postings that will be viewed by several thousand of the individual’s closest friends. Unlike changing the timbre of one’s voice, which is seldom considered, cosmetic surgery, like rhinoplasty, to improve appearance has become increasingly popular.

It should come as no surprise that a study by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFRS) found that many of their members were seeing a dramatic increase in requests for cosmetic procedures as a direct result of clients becoming more aware of their appearance due to social media. In rhinoplasty alone, AAFPRS members responding to the survey reported a 10 percent increase in rhinoplasty surgeries.  According to AAFPRS President, Edward Farrior, MD,:

“Social platforms like Instagram, Snapchat and the iPhone app Selfie.im, which are solely image based, force patients to hold a microscope up to their own image and often look at it with a more self-critical eye than ever before. These images are often the first impressions young people put out there to prospective friends, romantic interests and employers and our patients want to put their best face forward.”

There is an ongoing debate about the pros and cons of social media. The belief that the amount of time devoted to it that might be better used on something more productive aside, there is genuine concern about young people struggling to compete with the idealized versions of life posted by their peers. This can lead down any number of potentially self-destructive paths. Having rhinoplasty or any other form of cosmetic surgery in order to look like everyone else, especially when many of those images are quite likely enhanced with Photoshop, is not a good decision. However, not only “friends” see the images posted on social media. It has become almost standard practice for college admission committees and potential employers to review these sites before making their determinations. When an individual is confident of the image they are projecting, it shows and can only add points to whatever assessment is being made.

The bottom line is that selfies, just like mirrors and feedback from others should be used with a considerable amount of discrimination. The decision to have a nose job, made for the right reason, can be life-changing. The key is to find an experienced surgeon who will walk you through the process and who is compassionate enough to guide you in making the decision that truly is right for you.

Article by
Englewood Facial Plastic Surgeon