Plastic Surgery Rebates: Why I Have Mixed Feelings About Them

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Have you seen offers of $100 off Juvederm, or $50 off Dysport or Botox? Ever wonder where all this comes from? They’re rebates (something relatively new for medicine and plastic surgery). It looks like they’re here to stay, but I have mixed emotions about them.

Why Rebates?
Why do companies offer rebates? Well, really for the same reason that Kroger gives you a Kroger card. The manufacturer wants to entice you to use their product, and they want some information about you. So for most of these programs you need to enter a certain amount of demographic information which allows the manufacturer to know more about you, specifically if you are using their product. Some of this is product research and some is pure marketing. They want to know who you are and when they can get you to use their product.

How Rebates Work
Before you get tremendously excited about these you need to know how they work. Frequently you need to sign up for the program in advance of using the product in order to qualify for the rebate. Then you need to log into the program in order to claim the rebate, for which there is a time limit. This can all be a little difficult to understand on the front end, but to help you with this, we have created a separate page on our website that explains what the current rebates are, and how the different programs work. So to get the inside scoop on these check out our plastic surgery rebate information page.

A Word of Caution
Remember the adage that “you don’t get something for nothing.” There will be some work for you on your part (and we cannot do it for you). If this is the sort of thing that works for you, then you’re in luck.

My real concern about plastic surgery rebates have to do with enticing someone into a medical procedure. It might work like this: imagine you have had Botox (or Dysport) in the past and it is still working — should you go ahead and have it redone before the rebate runs out even though you don’t need it? What if you have never had a filler before and you’re on the fence about whether or not this is right for you? Should you just go ahead and do it because there is a rebate attached? I sort of think no to both of these. True, these are minimally invasive treatments and quite safe, but still…I’m just not sure if this the right approach.

Another issue for me is why should your friend get a discount last week and you don’t get one this week since the time period on the rebate program has lapsed. Again, maybe this is OK for the loss leader at the grocery store, but it seems a little off when it comes to medical procedures. This is why we developed the Reath Rewards program. For every dollar that you spend on non-surgical services in our office, you get points. When you have accumulated enough points you get a cash discount on your next service. These never expire, and the program is always going on.

To Rebate Or Not To Rebate? That Is The Question For You.
So, here’s the bottom line: rebate programs are here to stay, they require work on your part to make them work for you, and there are usually time restrictions on them. They shouldn’t be used as an enticement for a service you are not yet ready for or one that you are unsure of. And, the demographic information us enter is used by the manufacturer for marketing purposes. On the other hand, Reath Rewards is our loyalty program for you. It’s always there, and it only requires that you bring in your Reath Rewards card. (You still get Reath Rewards points on what you spend even if you are using a rebate program.)

All the best,

David B.

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Knoxville Plastic Surgeon