How Used Bras Support More Than You Think

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Anyone who knows even a little about my practice knows that I do a lot of breast surgery.  Small ones are made bigger, big ones are made smaller, and  many are lifted as well.  As you might imagine, the women who are undergoing these operations will be needing to make some adjustments to their wardrobe. That is to say, they need new bras.  One of the times I enjoy most during the recovery process from these operations, is when I tell my patients that the healing is at a point when they can go buy new bras.  This news is usually greeted with an ear to ear grin, exclamations of “Yippee!” (sometimes a hug), and an immediate trip to the mall.

Of course this means that their old, and kindly used bras need to go to make room for Victoria’s latest secret.  And, like most of us, these ladies don’t really want to just throw them away.  It seems wasteful.  I have the same trouble with old books I no longer need, and journals that now are all published on line.  It almost seems like a sin to throw a book away.  And the only way I have been able to reasonably cull my bookshelf is to send the books to the recycling bin.  But how to recycle bras?  Enter Breast Oasis.

This is a cool charity that we found out about at a recent meeting.  A fellow plastic surgeon in Akron, Ohio came up the great idea of giving these no longer needed bras to women who really need them.  So, he started a program of collecting these bras, laundering them, nicely packaging them, and donating them to charities such as homeless shelters, rescue missions, and the like. We thought this was a great idea, so we started doing this for our patients.

We have a nice collection bin in the office to help with this.  After they are laundered, my office staff is places them in attractive pouches (thank you, ladies), and on Saturday we donated about 75 bras to the Knoxville Community Chest through our church.

This is one of those feel-good things for all of us, and I thought we’d share this with you.

All the best,

David B.

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Knoxville Plastic Surgeon