Liposuction - THREE Years Later...- Scottsdale, AZ

Hi. Unlike many of the other very helpful reviews...

Hi. Unlike many of the other very helpful reviews on this site (which I diligently read prior to my procedure), I would like to review from the perspective of what my results are like THREE YEARS AFTER the procedure. I had liposuction of the upper & lower abdomen, inner & outer thighs, as well as the flanks, done in June of 2010. The procedure went as I expected for the most part, perhaps a little more pain during surgery than I thought, but nothing unbearable. Recovery was uneventful, long weekend in bed mostly, but up and about (still sore, of course) by Monday. Started wearing pants that week that had been very tight just days before. Very happy with the results!! Now, for what I've noticed about my body three years out. I am 5'11' and went into surgery at 152 lbs. Two weeks post, I was 148. (This is NOT a weight loss surgery, please don't go into it believing that, as you will be disappointed. This is a body re-shaping surgery, and with that in mind, I got exactly what I wanted.) Now, what I have noticed since my liposuction is that if I go up 5-8 lbs. (after a great vacation perhaps?! :) my upper body does in fact take on that extra weight. My boobs get bigger, my arms get noticeably thicker, and I can indeed see more fat on my back. Where I had the liposuction remains relatively the same, but the fat does need to land somewhere if your weight goes up, and for me, it lands in my upper torso. I make a strong effort to stay at 150 pounds, which is my "happy weight", but like most women, it can fluctuate up a bit, especially now that I am in my early 40's and the metabolism isn't what it used to be. Weighed myself yesterday, and I was 157 (just back from vacation), and yep, the thick arms and back fat are definitely noticeable when I look in a full-length mirror. Never had this before lipo, even at 157! Now, I will once again diet these extra pounds off, and the arms and back will lose their extra fat. Would I change my mind about doing the lipo, no, I would not. I'm still happy that I had it done, as having my saddlebags gone is a very good thing. However, PLEASE know, that there is a chance that if you gain some weight post-lipo (even just a few pounds), it WILL land somewhere else on your body that was NEVER a trouble spot before and create a new area that you once again may not be very happy with.
William Hall, MD

4 out of 5 stars Overall rating
3 out of 5 stars Doctor's bedside manner
5 out of 5 stars Answered my questions
4 out of 5 stars After care follow-up
4 out of 5 stars Time spent with me
5 out of 5 stars Phone or email responsiveness
5 out of 5 stars Staff professionalism & courtesy
5 out of 5 stars Payment process
5 out of 5 stars Wait times
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Thank you so much for the update , that will keep me motivated , you look AMAZING!
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Interesting review! You're as tall as me and the same weight, making me compare my results to yours. Good to know that new fat from weight gain goes elsewhere!
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Thank you for sharing your experience!
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I've had this issue as well, when I gain weight I notice it on my arms and back, even around my knees more.
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Firstly I never said I severely diet, my diet was protein based prior to surgery as I have gluten intolerance. My calorie level is in generally in a normal maintenance range. However, this range is lower than before surgery as my body is smaller and therefore needs less maintenance calories. It's simple science! Yes, before surgery diet was more highly effective. But the closer ou are to your ideal th harder it is. I used to be a USA 8 on he bottom and a 4 on top. Now it's a 6/6. This to me is a success. Low carb diets are very healthy as long a hey are not high in fat. Nuts, seeds, fish, eggs, poultry, and some greens/fruit......all good stuff! I don't feel sad, I fel good!
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Libby, I must disabuse you of what you think is healthy. It is proven that low carb diets are not only unhealthy they are, for most, unattainable. A balanced diet is the best. Healthy fats are good for us (olive oil, fat from healthy fish like salmon, etc etc). The problem with a low carb diet is that people CRAVE carbs and will often go off their diets and then have a cyclic problem (both emotional and physical). Beyond this, you have said that you have had to reduce your intake because of lipo. You can say it is natural and just science because your overall mass is different. But our bodies don't work that way at all! When you take away what is there, then the body wants it back. IF a person is able to LOSE the fat through exercise and diet (over time) then there is a better chance at maintaining. However having a traumatic removal puts other things into action. Like I said about the starvation study; it may put into motion an urge for the body to reclaim what was taken. Also the types of fat cells taken are not known (brown, large cell white, small cell white). Truly there is so much more to this than just sucking out fat and then everything is fine (as long as we don't "pig out"). Everything is usually not fine. And there will most likely be uncomfortable gains of fat stores in areas where it is not natural (arms, etc).
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So Is there a specific diet that is best post surgery to maintain or lose for those that have had lipo? I'm scheduled for surgery in Dec, so I want to know all that I can thank you. Robyn in Florida
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Robyn, I would say: Don't do it. There is no specific diet that will prevent this from happening. There was a study done during WWII called The Starvation Study. Men were starved (very reduced calories) for 6 months. When the study was over, the men regained their weight of course, but then regained 10 percent more! This is a bit different than lipo of course. But if you think about it, fat was depleted first (when starved); it was taken away. The body then overcompensated when the men were re-fed and they went beyond their regular weight. The point is this: Do you want to experiment this way with your body? Not only that but there are many other problems from this surgery. Also the shape women tend to get, in my opinion (and looking at myself) is this weird boxy shape, no curves anymore. The profile of the abdomen looks odd. Anyone who tells you there is a specific diet post surgery that will maintain a 'look' is lying. There isn't one. It's been well proven that diets don't even work. All the doctors will say will be: Just eat a healthy diet with normal calories. Oh and then they might give you the ubiquitous phrase: Liposuction is no excuse to 'pig out' . Which of course implies that you think it is an excuse and any odd weight or fat gain is your own fault. (However my body shape changed A LOT and one year after I was weighed at the office that did it and I weight 2 lbs less than when I had it done; because obviously the nurse practitioner saw the problem but she thought it had to be from weight gain..but it wasn't)
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This is exactly what happens to me on the weight gain side after lipo. You have to be prepared to stay at the weight you were directly after lipo to keep your upper body the same
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I think this is wrong. My body weight actually went down by 2 lbs yet my upper body changed dramatically; my arms and breasts grew to the point where I had to throw out half my clothes (clothes I had for years and years no longer fit me). There is also fat gained on my back, thighs, neck, etc. Anywhere fat is, it will increase.
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:( That must be really upsetting Sundogcoyote. It must be that each of our bodies respond differently. I have been lucky and providing my weight is no higher than my lipo weight I seem ok. My lipo was also 3 yrs ago.
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I agree that each body is different but I don't think we are all that much different. I mean you are saying that if you don't go higher than your pre-lipo weight (I'm guessing that's what you mean, right?) you are ok. But we should be able to gain a few pounds without our arms and breast (etc) becoming enormous. I guess my point is that we don't know enough about all this to really feel comfortable in getting it done. Think about the interior fat (around the organs) and how that must increase along with arm and breast fat. Yikes! That's a health risk. Also do we want the other areas of our bodies to go up and down like that? I don't know the whole thing seems to be terrible and people are not informed. Of course there will be those who take on fat differently but one won't know until it actually happens to her/him.
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Really good points, Sundogcoyote. I can't give anyone medical advice, but it seems to me that when women complain that their fat distribution patterns have changed, they are blamed for eating too much or not working out enough. However, the procedure is marketed to people (mostly women) who are already observing healthy diet and exercise habits, and are at their best weight and fitness. The same post-liposuction changes in fat distribution patterns were documented with rats during laboratory studies, and to my knowledge, no one accused the rats of ‘pigging out’. So, instead of warning women of this known effect CLEARLY AND UNEQUIVALICABLY before obtaining their money and supposed 'consent', women are chastised for having it happen to them. I've read of previously healthy women going on dangerous diets after liposuction in order to try to keep their fat from redepositing in uncomfortable, unattractive ways.
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To me, your hips and stomach look great in your 'before' photos. How much fat was removed from you? It's hard to gauge the results without knowing that. Being that you're 5'11', I guess that us shorter, smaller women will have to bare in mind that the amount would have to be relatively less! Also, if someone is obese and having lots of tissue removed, I guess the weight shifts that might happen for them post-liposuction can land somewhere else on their body that was NEVER a trouble spot before, and create new areas once again they may not be happy with. Thanks.
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Hi. My surgeon said that lipo was not recommended for obese people as it is not a weightloss surgery, but surgery to address size and shape of trouble spots for hose close to their ideal weight.
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Right, LibbyLou, i agree with you, and thats not my situation, but if you look at stories of surgery people are getting, you can see from the photos that many are obese. I've seen much fewer people who are tall and thin as KinAZ getting liposuction. They can take up to 5 liters at one time as an outpatient, and they can do high volume lipo in a hospital. They can also split up the sessions if they want to get more than 5 liters at once' so thats a lot of tissue that wold be shifting to somewhere else on people,. It may not be marketed for weight, but some amount of weight loss occurs, so if you already workout a lot and eat a healthy balanced before surgery, and then have less fat suddenly, do you exercise even more and/or eat even less to maintain the new fat loss? I couldnt eat less without a negative impact on my energy snd nutrient needs. Ive read stories women who resort to extreme dieting to try to maintain their weight loss of even a few pounds after liposuction. Less fat = less weight = less calories = less food, or even more exercise. Who is your doctor? How did the explain this obvious problem to you before surgery?
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Hi, I am in the UK and my Dr was Mr Vadadaria on Harley St. He was excellent, he looked at my muscle tone and fitness level and would only take me on because my weight was in healthy range with good fitness level. He explained that my shape is most probably hereditary and that further weight loss would not affect my problem areas (which I knew from experience) he said I was an ideal candidate for lipo but strongly warned me that if I gained weight post surgery I would have issues in other areas. He turns away clients who don't have control in place before surgery and also smokers. Weight loss candidates should look at things like gastric bands, hypnotherapy etc to help wi the weight control. Once close to ideal weight, lipo can help with shape. You are so right though, the smaller I got through lipo, the lower my maintenance calories need to be. I now find it harder than ever to diet effectively and weeks at a time on a no carb diet only loses me about 7 lb.
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LibbyLou, thanks for responding so quickly. Yeah, well put. The smaller the body gets through lipo, the lower the maintenance calories need to be. I've read about people going on severe diets after liposuction to try to 'maintain' their new size. That concerns me because I study nutrition, and obviously we need energy and multi-functional sustenance from food. Thanks again.
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The extreme dieting reports after liposuction are disturbing.
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So I'm not clear on why you think the surgery was a success for you when you are stuck with this idea you have to severely diet? Low carb diets are not that healthy; balanced nutrition is. I don't know I feel sad that women who would have been fine before now have to constantly worry about gaining or losing a pound or two.
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I absolutely do not understand why someone would think that surgery was a success if they need to constantly worry about a pound or two, as you point out. Carbs, limited carbs, or no carbs, having to monitor the body SO intensely seems so exhausting. I understand watching ones diet longterm and working out for fitness, but this change in fat depositing patterns... Sigh. What a drag. My body and health was ruined in surgery, I'd like to see women become aware. I expected only a tiny, little add on to breast reduction, but the surgeon suctioned out essential tissue. i was already extremely fit. i personally don't recommend the surgery, but people can read others experience and choose if it is for them or not.
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Thanks so much for this info!
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