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Results Will Never Make Up for the Bad Experience I Have Had

I had mesotherapy in October, November &...

I had mesotherapy in October, November & December last year. There was a fair amount of bruising, but I knew that this could happen. In January I developed very painful lumps with purple bruising around the areas I had the injections.(Hips and tummy) By February I was concerned as they were getting bigger and more painful. A doctor diagnosed lipoma, and sent me home. By the end of March I was in agony and running a fever. Went to another doctor and he said that it could be lipoma, but should maybe go in to theatre and have a look. General anaesthetic and a few hours later my surgeon came to see me and told me they were huge deep abcesses. The wounds were left open to drain, which they did for a month.Since then I have had 9 more removed, 3 general anaesthetics in 4 months, and have just found 3 more lumps! I am on methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis, which apparently can slow the process of abcesses forming.Was it worth it? Absolutely not!

South Coast Renew Clinic

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Mesotherapy treatments have been performed throughout Europe, South America, and more recently the United States for over fifty years. However, physicians have been concerned about both the efficacy and safety of mesotherapy, arguing that a lack of scientific study makes mesotherapy a fad with potentially dangerous side effects. "There is simply no data, no science and no information, to my knowledge, that mesotherapy works," according to Rod Rohrich, M.D., Chairman, Dept. of Plastic Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons issued a position statement not endorsing mesotherapy because to date, there has been no established mechanism of action, demonstrated efficacy, or established safety profile with any of the drugs used in mesotherapy. The FDA cannot control the use of practitioners injecting various mixtures into patient's bodies because this practice falls under the jurisdiction of state medical boards. Dr. Robin Ashinoff, speaking for the American Academy of Dermatology, says "A simple injection is giving people false hope. Everybody's looking for a quick fix. But there is no quick fix for fat or fat deposits or for cellulite." The American Society for Dermatologic Surgeryinformed its members in February 2005 that "further study is warranted before this technique can be endorsed." Many dermatologists and plastic surgeons are alarmed about the growing profile of mesotherapy. "No one says exactly what they put into the (syringe)," says Naomi Lawrence, a derma-surgeon at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. "One drug they often use, phosphatidylcholine, is unpredictable and causes extreme inflammation and swelling where injected. It is not a benign drug." USAToday 8/4/2004. It is currently banned in a number of South American countries. Even Brazil, which is less strict than the USA in drug approvals, has banned the drug for these purposes. In Australia, an alternative therapy salon is being investigated by the Health Department after several clients developed skin abscesses on the calves, bum, thighs, abdomen, shoulders, face and neck from the treatment, with one patient also developing a mycobacterial infection.
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