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After weight loss, my smile line looks different. How can I keep my smile line to stay the same? (photo)

Hello. So I have noticed that when I lose weight, my smile lines look different than when I am a few KGS heavier due to my cheeks being filled out I guess. The first pic is how the lines look when im on the thinner side, and the second is how they look when I have gained a few KGS. I'm discouraged to lose weight because of this. My cheeks do fill out when I have gained weight however always revert to how it looks on the first pic when I am leaner.

Doctor Answers (3)

Smile lines respond to filler injections

+1
Weight loss causes reduced volume in the cheeks, which deepens the nasolabial folds (smile lines).
I would consider injection of filler materials to the smile lines (Restylane is a good choice) or to the cheeks (Voluma, Restylane, Perlane, or Sculptra are all reasonable choices).


Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Smile Lines Changing with Weight Fluctuations

+1
Congratulations on losing weight, you should be proud of yourself.  Facial changes is a common occurrence and easily taken care of with fillers.  Seek a cosmetic dermatologist or plastic surgeon with expertise in treating men.  I wish you the best of luck, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Smile Lines after Weight Loss

+1
Your face will change and look different as you lose or gain weight.  What probably would make you feel more balanced when looking in the mirror would be to fill in the mid-face area (not the nasolabial area).  I would suggest either Sculptra or Voluma to replace the lost volume.  I have injected many men with Sculptra and it has extremely gradual and natural looking results lasting two years.  Please consult a board certified dermatologist for the best results.

Michele S. Green, MD
New York Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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