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When Does a Tooth Need a Crown?

My dentist wants to crown my teeth and my insurance company 's review board says it should be refilled. Both my teeth have had large old fillings and one has broken . My dentist told me to corwn them 3-4 years agom, but it just broke now. What to do?

Doctor Answers (3)

When Does a Tooth Need a Crown

+2

When approximately 50% of the solid healthy tooth structure is gone due to decay or an old filling, it should be crowned. Insurance companies do NOT LIKE TO SHELL OUT MONEY, so they will always try to advise to have another filling. They are not interested in your health. They are only interested in showing a profit to their shareholders. The proof is that you say that one of the teeth has broken.


New York Cosmetic Dentist

When Does a Tooth Need a Crown

+1

The short answer is when there is inadequate tooth structue to retain a filling and withstand the forces it receives from chewing, clenching, grinding, etc.  That judgement will vary between different dentists but if your tooth is chipping and has a large filling already sounds like a crown is appropriate.  Just because the insurance company says you do not need a crown means very little.  Oftentimes those decisions are made by non dental people who's main purpose is to deny treatment.  Repeated large fillings can lead to greater tooth loss and eventual need for root canal or extraction.

Donald L. Wilcox, DDS
Phoenix Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

When does a tooth need a crown?

+1

When it is cracked or fractured or the remaining tooth has more than two surfaces of filling... keep in mind all teeth have 5 surfaces top front back and two sides good luck

 

Kevin Coughlin DMD MBA, MAGD     CEO Baystate Dental PC

Kevin Coughlin, DMD
Springfield Cosmetic Dentist

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