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What is a Glycolic Peel Best for Treating?

Doctor Answers (7)

Glycolic Peels Best to treat?

+2

It is to target photo aging.  The benefits of a glycolic peel are to improve skin tone, increase the radience of the skin and diminish fine lines and wrinkles.


Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Glycolic acid peels are superficial but can be important for regular skin care

+2

Glycolic acid peels are superficial but can be important for regular skin care. They are superficial peels and the aggressiveness of the peel is dependent on the percentage of the glycolic acid in the preparation. They are fairly safe and it is very difficult to make them deep and thus complications are much lower as compared to other peels. One thing to remember is that sometimes the more aggressive you are the more results you will get for the most part. Glycolic acid peels that are from 0-30% can be done at home with some guidance. Anything stronger would be wise to be carry out with the guidance of a physician.

At home glycolic peels are a great way to keep up your skin from a maintanence stand point. I usually start patients on a skin care program with retinols, hydroxy acids, buffing cleansers, gentle cleansers and see how they do and tolerate it. Once this basic regimen is tolerated for a couple of weeks then I start them on the at home glycolic peels and guide them through this. With this regimen, you can get your skin to turnover much quicker (from 28 days to 10-14 days or less). This will help with unwanted pigmentation, decrease the size of pores, improve texture, and decrease fine wrinkles.

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Glycolic peels

+2

Glycolic peels are mild peels. They do not penetrate very deeply into the skin so they do not typically cause wounds. For this reason they are some of the safest peels. They are best to treat surface imperfections, for example, light skin discolorations, freckles, acne/blackheads. Glycolic acids also stimulate collagen building, so over time multiple glycolic peels may help with very fine wrinkles and acne scarring.

Most patients who get glycolic peels get a series of them every 2-4 weeks for 4 treatments, and periodically repeat that sequence. Because they are mild, the results after each treatment are subtle but over time can make a big difference.

Jordana S. Gilman, MD
Atlanta Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

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Glycolic acid a good place to start for basic skin care routine

+1

Start with 30% glycolic acid (GA) peel with an aesthetician under supervision of a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon. Subsequent GA peels can involve greater concentration, e.g. 50%, 70%. Regular superficial GA peels can bring about 'baby steps' for rejuvenation.

William Ting, MD
Bay Area Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Glycolic Peels

+1

Glycolic peels are superficial.  A series of glycolic peels may help eliminate damaged skin cells, unclog pores and impart a healthier glow.
 

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Glycolic peels can be used for a variety of skin problems

+1

Hi there-

Glycolic Peels are great for treating hyperpigmentation, a dull tone, rough texture and general aging of the skin.

Whether you are concerned about brown spots, fine lines, enlarged pores or simply wanting a smoother, brighter skin tone, glycolic peels can be extremely beneficial for many skin types and patients of all ages.

Armando Soto, MD, FACS
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 98 reviews

Glycolic peels beneficial for superficial discolorations

+1

Glycolic peels are superficial and have mixed results. A regular regimen of peels is probably beneficial for minimizing superficial discolorations. I do not think glycolic peels will work well for wrinkles.

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.