I Only Have a Week to Recover from Rhinoplasty, is This Long Enough?

I'm in outside sales where I see about 8 accounts/ day and drive about 100 miles/day. I only have a week to recover at home. Is this long enough for Rhinoplasty surgery?

Doctor Answers (15)

Time needed to recover from rhinoplasty

+1

Visible swelling and bruising after a rhinoplasty is typically 10 days.  On rare occasions it can last upwards of 2-2½ weeks.  It is best to extend your vacation beyond 1 week in case you have extensive bruising and are unable to make a professional appearance for work or social activities.  


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Rhinoplasty Recovery

+1

Hello,

It is best to allow 2 weeks to recover from the surgery. Going back to work and exerting yourself sooner will likely increase swelling and delay your healing time. Depending on what is performed during your rhinoplasty surgery, you may have residual bruising present under the eyes. Thank you, and I hope this helps answer your question.

Dr. Nassif

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Working after Rhinoplasty

+1

This is a question that I get nearly every day!!

Here's what I tell my patients:  The majority of the healing following rhinoplasty, perhaps 80%, takes place in the first 8 weeks. Of course, this is a gradual process--the first week is the worst and after that you'll notice day-by-day improvement.  The truth is, the nose continues to heal for the first 1 year.  However, it is only about 20% of the total healing that occurs between 2 months and 1 year.

My patients have a cast on the nose for the first 1 week, so I recommend people take off 8-10 days from work.  However, only 3 days off of work following surgery is mandatory.  After that, if you don't mind going to work with a cast on your nose, go right ahead!

Andrew Winkler, MD
Lone Tree Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

You might also like...

Rhinoplasty Recovery

+1

In general, I tell the average patient to allow 7-10 days after rhinoplasty before returning to work. However, my recommendations will vary depending on what is done during their operation. Discuss this with your surgeon before scheduling surgery.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Recuperating from a rhinoplasty

+1

At one week you are still going to have a fair amount of swelling present which will be discernable to even the casual observer. The amount will also be dependent on the amount of work that needed to be done and whether an open rhinoplasty was performed. [Often, I will place some butterfly tapes (steri-strips) near the tips for around another week for more predictable healing and contouring.] Most of my patients prefer to wait until their splint is removed at around 1 week before they return to non-strenuous work or school

The other significant issue for you is the amount of activity that you will be engaging in including driving around 100 miles. Many patients will still have some fatigue or tire more quickly than usual. For you, this could be quite dangerous. It would be far more prudent and safer if you gave yourself around 2 weeks off or at least cut back substantially in your meetings and driving for the 1st week back.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Recovery After Rhinoplasty

+1

Everyone heals at a slightly different rate following rhinoplasty. The nasal splint is typically removed at one week following the surgery. At this point there may be some residual swelling and bruising that can typically be camouflaged with some foundation make-up.  Most patients are presentable socially at this point and the majority return to work at one week post-operatively.  One secret I tell my patients is to spray tan before returning to work if they have some residual bruising that is difficult to cover entirely with make-up.   Lastly, I prefer to perform a "closed" rhinoplasty procedure in most patients because the recovery period is much shorter than with the “open” approach due to less initial bruising and swelling post-operatively.

Gary Motykie, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

1 week recovery after Rhinoplasty not enough

+1

 I have performed Rhinoplasty for over 20 years and IMHO, 1 week is not enough time after a Rhinoplasty to be traveling hundreds of miles as a working salesperson.  IMO, you're setting yourself up for failure and frankly, I'm surprised that you found an experienced Rhinoplasty surgeon who agreed to do your Rhinoplasty under those conditions...I would have respectfully declined until you had at least double the amount of time off before going back to that type of work.  Not just the healing, but you will be bruised and swollen for those sales calls....

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Recovery time

+1

I advise most of my patients that they can return to work after a week. You may still have some bruising or swelling and you may not be able to go at 110 % but you should be ok. You want to be extra careful about not being distracted in the car on the phone etc-banging your face on the steering wheel or an airbag deployment would not be a good thing.

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Working 1 week after rhinoplasty is fine.

+1

Working 1 week after rhinoplasty is fine for the type of work you do. I would not want you pumping iron for several weeks.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

One week recovery after rhinoplasty

+1

While usually the splint and any stitches are removed after a week, more than likley you will have residual bruising for about 2 weeks and certainly swelling for a while.  You can go back to desk work after a week, but you more than likely be bruised.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.