Voluma or Radiesse?

Is it true that you would need more syringes of voluma for the same effect as radiesse? Do they produce a different "look"? Can voluma also produce a more defined look as well?

Doctor Answers (8)

Voluma for cheek volume

+2
Voluma is relatively new to the market and it is an excellent product that is easy to use and well tolerated.  In my opinion the voluma seems to be smoother and I find it injects very nicely especially in the central cheek.

Voluma is also reversible in the rare instance where the filler needs to be removed - Radiesse cannot be removed. Personally, I have not injected a single patient with Radiesse in the cheeks since Voluma was approved in the US because patients have loved the treatment and referred their friends asking for it.

I think it feels very natural and is more malleable,  meaning it can be molded into a nicer cheekbone shape. There is nothing wrong with Radiesse but I personally feel that Voluma is a superior product when performing non-surgical cheek augmentation. I hope this information is helpful.


Fort Worth Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

#Voluma or #Radiesse for cheek augmentation?

+2
These choices are all about trade-offs. Voluma is likely more expensive on a cost per milliliter stand-point but lasts 2-4 times as long as Radiesse in the cheeks. Voluma is also reversible in the rare instance where the filler needs to be removed - Radiesse cannot be removed. Personally, I have not injected a single patient with Radiesse in the cheeks since Voluma was approved in the US. I think it looks and feels more natural and is more malleable meaning it can be molded into a nicer cheekbone shape. There is nothing wrong with Radiesse but I personally feel that Voluma is a superior product when performing non-surgical cheek augmentation. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Voluma Vs. Radinesse

+2
Facial volume augmentation can be achieved with multiple FDA approved fillers like Voluma, Radiesse and Restylane. Clinical results should be similar besides the type of filler used if injected by an experienced injector. The longevity of the results may vary depending on the type of filler used. The soft tissue fillers based on HA (Hyaluronic Acid) like Voluma have the advantage of being “reversible” with he injection of an enzymatic solution shall it be necessary.

Patients seeking facial soft tissue agumentation with fillers like Voluma or Radiese should undergo consultation with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon expert in aesthetic surgery of the face

John Mesa, MD
Livingston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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Voluma or Radiesse

+2
Voluma or Radiesse don't really produce a different look if they are injected in the same manner.  Radiesse  is less expensive per tube and comes in a larger amount than Voluma (1.8cc vs 1.0cc) and thus someone could use more tubes of Voluma to achieve the same effect.  Voluma lasts at least 24 months however compared to about 6 months for Radiesse.  I also find that Voluma causes a little less bruising.

Seth Kates, MD
Worcester Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Voluma vs Radiesse

+1
Although Radiesse syringes are larger than Voluma (1.5 cc vs. 1.0 cc) I find I need almost exactly the same number of syringes since Voluma lifts better than Radiesse.

Lorrie Klein, MD
Laguna Niguel Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 171 reviews

Voluma is FDA approved for adding Volume to the Cheeks

+1
Voluma is the only filler approved by the FDA for cheek augmentation.  Radiesse is used off label for this purpose.  Voluma is excellent at lifting with small volumes.  It is true that Radiesse is supplied in larger syringes (1.5 cc versus 1.0 cc for Voluma), but Voluma has a 2 year longevity indication by the FDA.  This doesn't mean that Voluma will last a full 2 years.  In the FDA study, over 50% of the subjects still had correction at 2 years.  So it is likely that a touch up of a syringe or 2 will be necessary at a year or so to maintain the results with Voluma.  The other benefit of Voluma is that it is a hyaluronic acid product, so in case there was a situation in which you wanted it reversed or removed, there is an injection of an enzyme that can dissolve it, unlike Radiesse.  Thus, it could be considered safer, as well.

Kent V. Hasen, MD
Naples Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Voluma or Radiesse

+1
These are two totally different fillers with different indications. Some of this patient selection and some is where the patient needs filler. Keep in mind Voluma is indicated only for mid face/cheek. Discuss options with a board certified dermatologist. 

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Voluma and Radiesse for facial volume filler and refreshed appearance

+1
I have used Voluma since it was FDA approved and have been very impressed with the smoothness of delivery that I can feel as it flows during my gentle injections. Radiesse is a pleasure to use as well but requires mixing of some anesthetic prior to its injection.  Voluma is a hyaluronic acid filler so it's reversible with an enzyme should it be necessary but Radiesse will last until the body dissolves it which is about one year or slightly more or less. Indications are that Voluma may last up to two years. Voluma is not approved for any area of the face and many patients can benefit from Voluma in the mid cheek/cheek bone area while Radiesse can be used in the temples and lower face. The cost of Voluma and Radiesse must take into account the slightly larger syringe of Radiesse but the one year expectancy of its duration compared with the two years of Voluma.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.