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White Mole Under my Eye? Suggestions? (photo)

I have a white small mole just under my eye. Suggest any remedies. What type of treatment should I take, i.e affordable, without pain nd complications.

Doctor Answers (6)

Mole removal from eyelid

+2

This sounds as though it may be a cyst or an atypical mole that needs biopsy. An examination will help determine the dangers of the mole and the need for excision or conservative management. 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Mole Removal on Eyelid

+2

Mole removal on the eyelid is common for most dermatologists. A few doctors are not comfortable doing the procedure since it takes a very steady hand. In my office, I would make sure you are comfortable and relaxed (as much as possible). Then I would numb the mole by slowly injecting a few drops of numbing medicine with a very tiny needle. Most patients say it is barely noticeable when done properly.

The mole is excised using a small blade while keeping the eyelid steady by gently pulling it down. I usually have the patient look up if working on the lower lid. That way the eye is safe and the patient is more relaxed. If there is any bleeding, I use an instrument somewhat like a laser.

We add a dab of Vaseline petroleum jelly or Aquaphor. On a small mole like yours, no bandage is necessary. The eyelid is swollen for a day or so and the spot where the mole was removed normally heals in 3-5 days.

 

T. Wayne Day, MD
Nashville Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Mole removal

+1

Your options would include doing either a shave biopsy or a complete surgical excision.  I would recommend that you see a facial plastic surgeon or a dermatologic surgeon for an evaluation and possible treatment.

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 144 reviews

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Mole removal

+1

The treatment for this would be excision and plastic surgical closure.  This can be performed under local anesthesia in the office.  Of course, it takes surgical skill to leave the optimal, fine-line scar.  My wife had a similar lesion in exactly that area which turned out to be a basal cell carcinoma.  We can never rule out cancer without a biopsy and, at minimum, you should see a dermatologist or plastic surgeon for an evaluation.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Removal of moles on the face

+1

There is always an optimal way to remove moles on the face.  The choice depends on location, the type of mole or growth, the pattern of growth.   We often look at the choice between a shave excision which is done on growths that are more on the surface of the skin and protruding outward or a deep excision with some followup suturing if the growth is deeper in the skin and cannot be removed with the simple shave.  If anesthetic is carefully injected, the discomfort is truly minimal.  Simple shaves are fast and less expensive that having to cut and stitch. I generally recommend that the lesion removed is biopsied, so be sure to ask your doctor about this as well and find out what the biopsy and pathology read will cost you as well.

Steven Swengel, MD
Los Gatos Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Removing moles on the eyelid

+1

The good news is that when I remove nevi (moles) on the eyelid, I will usually use a "shave excision" method. With this technique, the mole is actually "shaved off" at a very superficial level just below the surface of the skin. This method is quite effective and leaves a minimal scar. The procedure typically takes less than a minute and is fairly painless. It is frequently covered by insurance when the mole is removed for certain "medically necessary" indications. Dermatologic surgeons are experts at doing this procedure.

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.