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Can a Tummy Tuck Hide my Vertical Scar?

I have a vertical scar center my abdomen that starts above my belly button and goes down not quite to pubic hair line. I have a skin apron lately too from weight loss. I have no stretch marks and good skin, can a tummy tuck remove the majority of this vertical scar or at least enough to wear a bathing suit bottom or low rise jeans?

Doctor Answers (17)

Vertical scar can usually be removed with Tummy Tuck

+4

To carolinagirl965,

Hi! This a very good question, because the vertical scar bothers a lot of women. In general, it can be removed, because the skin from the belly button down is removed.

Even when the vertical scar cannot all be removed, the short part that remains is brought down to just above the pubic hair. So you can wear a bikini bottom or low cut jeans

Go see a board certified plastic surgeon.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Vertical scar

+4

If you have an apron of skin from weight loss and a prominent vertivcal incision, chances are excellent that a majority of your scar can be removed.

With patients who have lost a great deal of weight, the abdominal and sometimes the flank skin hangs down, so removing this skin can be very beneficial for the right patient.

The incision is usually a lower abdominal incision that is horizontal and much more concealable under clothing than a vertical scar.

Brent Moelleken, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Tummy tuck that scar away

+3

Carolina Girl,

Depending on how high above the belly button your scar goes, you may be able to have it completely removed. A full tummy tuck can remove the skin (including your scar) sometimes an inch or two above the belly button. See your board certified plastic surgeon for a consultation. Good luck!

Kenneth R. Francis, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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Your vertical scar can be reduced.

+3

It is quite possible to reduce your vertical significantly. It all really depends on the laxity of your skin. If you have great skin laxity, then more of it can be excise. Usually with abdominoplasty it is safe to say that all the skin between your pubic area and your belly button can be excised (removed). However, in most cases we can also excise 3 to 4 more cm above your belly button. This should allow for most of your scar to be removed. If you post a picture, we could likely give you more specific advice. Good luck with your surgery.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

A tummy tuck should hide a good amount of your scar

+3

The amount of excess skin you have, will determine how much of the scar can be removed. In patients with significant weightloss, is common for the skin from just above the umbilicus (belly button) to the pubic region to be removed. This should remove most of the scar you described.

Remember that you are trading a horizontal scar for the vertical, which is easier to conceal.

Michael S. Beckenstein, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

A tummy tuck probably will not remove all of your scar

+3

Whether you would be able to remove the entire scar depends how far above your belly button your scar goes and how lax your skin is.

Generally speaking, you cannot remove the entire scar. This does give you a chance to have your plastic surgeon revise the verticle scar, bring the edge together, and narrow your waist a bit for added benefit.

However, it is not unusual to have more complications when you have a midline scar and are attempting to narrow the waist, as the blood supply can't travel across the scar very well. We are able to take some of the skin out vertically and usually leave a better scar than what the general surgeon left you with. Good luck. You should be very happy!

Dan Mills, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Full Tummy Tuck will probably remove about half the vertical scar

+2

A Full Tummy Tuck will usually remove about half of a full length vertical abdominal scar. It varies based upon how much skin can be removed during your tummy tuck operation, of course.

John P. Di Saia, MD
Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Tummy tuck can excise vertical scar

+2

In response to your question, yes it is very possible that the abdominoplasty can excise a majority of your vertical scar.

Whether it can be hidden beneath a bikini or low-rise jeans is more dificult to say. However, this can llkely be determined in the course of an consultation.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Depends on how high above your belly button

+1

In general, when there is sufficient skin laxity, I am able to excise about 2 cm of skin above the top of the umbilicus. So it depends how high your scar goes above your belly button and how lax your skin is. Judging by your description, I would say that you have good amount of skin laxity to be able to pull the abdominal skin pretty low, now it just depends how high your scar goes above the belly button.

Just remember that the vertical scar may be concealed and low, but you are in for a trade off of a tighter abdomen, flatter abdomen and non visible vertical scar, but you will have a horizontal scar that would likely go from hip to hip. However, the nice thing about this is that it is a lot easier to conceal than a vertical scar.

Hope that helps.

Farbod Esmailian, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Tummy tuck scars

+1

If you have a vertical scar from a previous procedure, the area that is below the umbilicus will most likely come out during a full tummy tuck. You will probably be left with a portion of the scar that is just above the umbilicus.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.