Ask a doctor

Tummy Tuck - I Have a Vertical C-section Scar from 20 Yrs Ago and Several Health Concerns

I have a vertical c-section scar and lots of excess skin on my abdomen from 20 yrs ago. My conscern is the healing process. I am a type-1 diabetic. I also have had multiple DVT's over the years and am now on permanent blood thinners. I am only a little overweight but I am in fairly good health. Also, as a diabetic, I use an insulin pump and I use my abdomen as my primary insertion site. Also, any guess on how much these health issues will increase the total overall cost.

Doctor Answers (8)

Tummy Tuck in a Type I Diabetic on blood Thinning Medication for a history of Blood Clotthing

+2

Regarding: "Tummy Tuck - I Have a Vertical C-section Scar from 20 Yrs Ago and Several Health Concerns
I have a vertical c-section scar and lots of excess skin on my abdomen from 20 yrs ago. My conscern is the healing process. I am a type-1 diabetic. I also have had multiple DVT's over the years and am now on permanent blood thinners. I am only a little overweight but I am in fairly good health. Also, as a diabetic, I use an insulin pump and I use my abdomen as my primary insertion site. Also, any guess on how much these health issues will increase the total overall cost
."

The Type I diabetes raises the risk of a Tummy Tuck, the history of DVT raises the likelihood of recurrent possibly fatal blood clots much higher making you a VERY high risk for a Tummy Tuck. If you FULLY understand that a Tummy Tuck operation may become complicated by life threatening complications and poor, ugly results AND your Hematologist (Blood doctor) agrees in writing that it is safe for you to have a Tummy Tuck and he agrees to stop the blood thinning completely for at least 72 hours - only then would I consider operating on you.

Since it appears you are cost conscious, please consider that treating complications is much more expensive than the original cosmetic surgery. In the case of infections, blood clots and wound disruption this could amount to tens of thousands of dollars.

Dr. Peter Aldea


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Risk of diabetes and tumy tuck

+2

It is not your conditions that will increase the cost but more importantly will increase the risk. I would similarly not advise you to have the procedures because this would require cessation of anticoagulants which you cannot risk at this point in time

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Tummy Tuck - I Have a Vertical C-section Scar from 20 Yrs Ago and Several Health Concerns

+2

From your posted medical conditions I feel you are not a candidate for elective cosmetic surgery. Sorry. Have you seen any boarded plastic surgeons in person? And please discuss with your medical doctors. I think all will agree that you are a very high risk patient. From MIAMI Dr. Darryl J. Blinski, 305 598 0091

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Diabetes and Tummy Tuck

+1
Thank you for your post. Diabetes is a disease that should demand a healthy respect from both surgeon and patient in plastic surgery. It is a disease that affects the immune system and can increase the risk of infection, a disease that affects the healing potential of a wound and can cause opening of a wound, and is a disease of the circulation that can lower the blood flow to the operated tissue and cause necrosis or tissue death. This needs to be managed as follows:

1. Tight blood glucose control with diet, exercise, and medication. You need to see your internal medicine doctor regularly and make sure your diabetes is well controlled.
2. If you are overweight, then losing weight decreases your risk in tummy tuck surgery or any other surgery for that matter.
3. If you have high blood pressure, this needs to be managed and well controlled by your internal medicine doctor as well.
4. ABSOLUTELY NO SMOKING!
5. Consider with your surgeon HyperBaric Oxygen therapy pre- and post-op.
6. Make sure you understand from your surgeon and anesthisiologist what medications you should take or not take prior to surgery.

It is very possible to have a great outcome as a diabetic following tummy tuck surgery, but minimizing the risk is the most rational way of accomplishing this.

Best Wishes,
Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Tummy tuck and medical conditions

+1

Some people are just not healthy enough for elective cosmetic suregery. With all your medical problems I would caution you about pursuing surgery with the potential risks involved based upon your history.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Surgery has to be avoided

+1

Since you have multiple medical issues,you are not a good candidate for any planned aesthetic surgery.Your diabetes along with recurrent DVT & PE ,means that any type of surgery/anasthesia will carry an extra risk for you.

Anup Dhir, MD
India Plastic Surgeon

You are not a candidate for elective surgery

+1

You have multiple reasons to avoid elective plastic surgery . Your risk of DVT and pulmonary embolism is too high and no plastic surgeon should even think about cosmetic surgery on you.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Bad candidate for surgery

+1

You are a bad candidate for elective cosmetic surgery, mainly because of the history of DVT and blood thinners requirement. This increases your chances of recurrent DVT and/or Pulmonary embolism (PE) significantly.  Dabietes will increase your chances of having complications, mainly infection or diabetic metabolic complications. You need to schedule several consultations with board certified plastic surgeons, you will have difficulties finding a surgeon willing to operate on you, however you probably will. Before deciding be sure to consult other surgeons and remember that if most of the surgeons agree that you are a bad candidate for surgery then, you are.

Victor M. Perez, MD, FACS
Kansas City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.