Is Vasculitis a Contraindication for Laser Resurfacing?

I'm a 25 y\o female, five months ago i was diagnosed with vasculitis that the doctors weren't sure if it was henoch schonlein or reactive vasculitis.

The rash appeared on my legs for about 2 weeks and gone without any complications. Now i want to do laser resurfacing for my face or at least microdermabrasion for fine wrinkles, but i have read that autoimmune disorders are contraindications for such procedures.

Is it dangerous for me? What are the risks? thanks

Doctor Answers (3)

Vasculitis is a contraindication for ablative resurfacing

+2

Ablative laser resurfacing, which removes skin and requires healing of the skin, should not be done on patients with vasculitis. Vasculitis interferes with your blood vessels ability to heal the resurfacing wound.

I would consider non-ablative resurfacing. Newer fractional non-ablative resurfacing (Starlux 1540 and fraxel) do not remove skin and may be tolerated.

However, I would do a small test area behind your ear and wait 6 weeks to see how your skin responds and to make sure you heal.

I would not worry about doing microdrmabrasion on you as long as your skin looked normal, had no break outs and skin lesions, and your skin healed well after a cut or scratch. If you are on high dose steroids to treat your vasculitis I would not do microdermabrasion.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Vasculitis - procedures that can trigger an inflammatory response

+1

Vasculitis is a term used to describe a heterogeneous group of diseases that results in inflammation of blood vessels. Arteries and veins of any size in any organ may be affected, leading to ischemic damage to organs.

There is small vessel, medium vessel and large vessel vasculitis.

I could not find any scientific literature on Medline search with the key words of 'laser resurfacing' and 'vasculitis'. I would caution you to have anything done that could provoke or initiate an inflammatory response in your vessels, i.e. vasculitis - and threfore, avoid laser resurfacing. If you are intent on trying it, have them work on a very small area to see the response before you get the whole thing done.

I would also clear this with your rheumatologist before you have this procedure done.

Hratch Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Buffalo General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

That is tricky

+1

As a general rule, for cosmetic surgery, you want things to be optimum. If you have active vasculitis, I would not recommend it, because of the risk of scarring.

I think microdermabrasion would be fine, but I would check with your rheumatologist and plastic surgeon before considering an aggressive procedure like laser resurfacing.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

You might also like...

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.