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Vagina Swelling After Tummy Tuck?

Had tummy tuck with lipo, it will be a year in December. Still have swelling and top of vagina is always swollen! What could be the cause?

Doctor Answers (3)

Swelling after Tummy Tuck

+1

Several possibilities - I'm assuming your swelling is in the area around below the tummy tuck incision, also called the pubic region. And I'm assuming it's much better than after surgery but not gone entirely.

  • If this area was liposuctioned, it can take a year to fully subside. Occasionally very low dose steroid injection will help it subside.
  • Sutures, especially permanent ones. Occasionally cause persistent swelling. The swelling will often be tender.
  • Bunching of tissue as the result of surgery. At this point it is unlikely to improve and may need minor surgical correction.

I suggest seeing your surgeon to see what s/he thinks is the likely cause so you can be reassured or treated. Best wishes.

 

If your liposuction 

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Vagina swelling after tummy tuck

+1

Swelling after a tummy tuck is common and swelling often flows dependently.  It is pretty common  for the groin region to be swollen.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

“Vaginal” Swelling after Tummy Tuck Surgery?

+1

Given that you are 8 months out of your tummy tuck operation, residual “swelling” would be unusual. You may want to ask your plastic surgeon about this area of concern; he/she will be in the best position to advise you after direct examination.

Sometimes, after tummy tuck surgery, patients see their suprapubic area more clearly/directly than they did before the operation. Sometimes, additional surgery (direct skin excision and/or liposuction surgery may be necessary to improve the contour of this suprapubic area.

I hope this helps.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/Procedure_tummyTuck.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 627 reviews

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