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Forehead Scarring Tissue Expansion? (photo)

I have acne scarring + atrophy from cortisone in the center of my forehead & between the eyes. I've tried numerous treatments, some being subcision and laser and have seen some improvements. The scarring is still has negative affects on my quality of life. The skin on my forehead next to the middle is smooth and unscarred. As a last resort would using this skin for tissue expansion be a viable option? Has it ever been used for acne scarring? This time I attached a photo.

Doctor Answers (2)

Fractional Resurfacing for Acne Scarring

+1

Thank you for your question and photo. Acne and acne scarring can be trememdously debilitating and frustrating. The psychological effects of acne is usually underestimated.  Fractional resurfacing is one of the safest and effective treatments for large areas of acne scarring. Over time it can stimulate the production of collagen to fill in the depressed areas.  It does take a series of treatments.  The deeper the scarring the greater the number of treatments.  Tissue exapansion would not be indicated for your scarring. The resulting scars would be worse than the current condition.

Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Treatment of acne scars

+1

You have the perfect sort of scarring that responds beautifully to factional ablative laser technology.  This technology essentially 'drills' small columns of skin and dermis  out of the scarred area in such a way that the healing and repair actually begins to return the skin to 'normal' appearance over a period of time.  You need to be careful to not over treat in a single treatment as exceeding a threshold of percent of area treated can result in paradoxical scarring.  Having used both Fraxel and Profractional FX technology, I prefer the latter as it is faster, more even and can penetrated deeper into the skin.  Hope that helps!

Los Gatos Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

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