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Different Eye Size After Blepharoplasty

I am 29 years old, and had upper/lower blepharoplasty 12 days ago, with outside incisions. I cannot put into words how upset I am with myself for doing this. I feel I will never be able to leave the house again without large sunglasses. My left eye is much larger than my right now. My right eye was bigger than it is now before the surgery. My left eye looks like I thought both eyes would look. I have been to my Dr., crying in his office just today. Although he says I still have swelling that needs to go away, he acknowledges the difference in my eye size. I have recently read that Botox can cause your eyelid to droop, and I know he used that. Could that be why my eye looks so much smaller than the other? If so, can I use eye drops so soon after surgery?

Doctor Answers 14


I am very sorry that you are suffering but the good news is that most likely this asymmetry wil resolve as things heal. This is a very very short time after surgery and I would not be worried at this point. I am not clear why your doctor used botox during your blepharoplasty unless you asked for it but Botox can cause a droopy eyelid so I would wait until the botox wore off....3 months.

Denver Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Different Eyes after Eye Job (Blepharoplasty)

12 days post-operatively is still WAY early for you to expect complete healing. The healing process will go on for months and the results WILL continue to improve.

Without photographs it is hard to tell if you have surgical complications or are just upset by the swelling we surgeons regard as routine and know will resolve with time,

I HOPE your surgeon is a Board certified Plastic surgeon (check here, ENT or Ophthalmologist. Unfortunately, many other physicians "practice" this surgery without having trained in it. Since very few Plastic surgeons would have operated on a 29 year old without major lid drooping, I suspect your surgeon MAY fall into the latter group.

At this time, you should focus your energies on healing. If a revision surgery is required, it should not be done for at least 6 months to allow the swelling to normalize.

Good Luck.

Dr. P. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Upper blepharoplasty in young women.


1) I know this doesn't help you, but other people read these postings. Upper blepharoplasty should almost never be done on a 29 year old.

2) It sounds like you have a bad result. But I am pretty sure you can be improved.

3) Don't do anything for 6 months, and then get 2 or 3 evaluations by board certified plastic surgeons.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Too early to determine

It is still too early to determine, and impossible to know the final healing result since you are only 12 days after the surgery. Corrections can be made after six months’ time (to ensure full healing), however it really depends upon the presenting issues, asymmetry regarding the shape of the eyelid, muscle structure and fat components of the both upper and lower lids before deciding on any corrective surgery.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Give the healing time to settle down

Presently you are in the early postoperative healing phase. There are a lot of factors involved in why the eyes look different. It could be due to a number of factors including how your eyes looked preoperatively, whether the surgeon had to use a different technique on the two upper eyelids, a difference in the amount of postoperative swelling, and even if you sleep on one side versus sleeping on your back.

It's important to keep your follow up appointments with the physician so that he or she can see the progress of the healing. The physician may also have certain exercises or other postoperative instructions that you need to follow in order to improve the results.

Often times, if revisions need to be made, they can be in the office under a local anesthetic.


Joseph M. Perlman, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews


You are judging the result too early. You have trusted your doctor to operate on you and you trust him for the post operative care too. Wait till your swelling is resolved.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 92 reviews

You are only 12 days post-op

You are only 12 days post-op. There is considerable swelling that has to resolve and the tissues have to settle. You should not worry one bit for at least two more months. You really need to be patient to see the final results. Having surgery is not like buying new clothes. There is a recovery phase and you are just at the beginning of it. Good luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Wait and be patient

Without pre and postop photos of you it is hard to tell too much but I agree totally with the advice given by the other doctors about waiting at least 3-4 months until swelling has gone away. Also, don't repeat any Botox for that time to keep this variable out of the equation.

You'll get better

Twelve days post surgery is WAY too soon to critically evaluate your results. You still have swelling that can affect one eye more than the other resulting in asymmetry. Be patient and trust your surgeon. What he/she has said is true. Good luck!

It's Too Soon

I understand how you feel but you have to wait. The natural healing time for all of the tissues to heal, the deeper tissues as well, is 6 weeks. Depending on how much work your surgeon did will depend on the resolution of the swelling.

With that said, occassionally sutures can break or pull out. It sounds like it's your lower lids that are at issue (although this is only a guess without pictures).

So be patient, don't perseverate on your eyes. An accurate diagnosis cannot be made for 6 weeks and a revision shouldn't be done for 4-6 months.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.