Eyeball Bruising After Blepharoplasty

I had upper and lower blethoplasty and bilateral ptosis surgery 7 days ago. In the last 48 hours I have developed blood throughout the right eyeball. It does not affect vision and there is no "extra" pain. I am told it is eyeball bruising. How long should I expect this to last? Thank you.

Doctor Answers (4)

Subscleral bruising after a blepharoplasty

+1

If there is any bruising of the lids sometimes this gets under the sclera of the eye.  It is just a loose soft tissue plane.  Neither of these issues is dangerous or abnormal. It sometimes takes several weeks to resolve. 


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Blood on eye ball

+1

This is something that can happen every once in a while. There is no mayor problem at this time, except for the inconvenience of having the red eye for a couple of weeks. There should not be any danger from it.

Gustavo A. Diaz, MD
Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Bruised eye ball

+1

I assume you are referring to a bright red blood spot over the white of the eye (sub conjunctival hemorrhage).  This may be present for up to a few weeks, and doesn't hurt anything.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

You might also like...

This type of bruising is relatively common

+1

This type of bruising is called a subconjunctival hemorrhage.  However and eyeball bruise does get the idea across. The blood is bright red because oxygen in the air readily passes through the conjunctive to keep the blood oxygenated and bright red. Depending on how extensive the hemorrhage, it may be with you one or two weeks. At this point out from surgery, you should not be in much pain.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.