Unusual Scarring and Protruding Sutures After Chin Implant. Is This Normal? (photo)

I had revision chin implant three weeks after the original one was done. (The first one was mal positioned) This new implant is properly placed but, I have very unusual scarring and two protruding sutures. I want to know if this is normal. Or maybe the scarring was caused because revision surgery was done too soon? Also whats causing the protruding sutures? I have attached two pictures. Any feedack would be greatly appreciated.

Doctor Answers (6)

Problems with Healing after Chin Augmentation

+1

Yes, this is unusual and you may have an infection. The cause may be as simple  a buried suture or ingrown hair. More serious of course is infection of the implant itself. I suspect your surgeon will want to see you ASAP and prescribe an antibiotic after culturing any drainage.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Chin implant incision

+1

Hello, and sorry to hear about the issue you are experiencing following your procedure. 3 weeks is very soon to revise a chin implant. The look of your scar is likely due to the fact that you did not have enough time between surgeries, and there may be an issue with your healing. I would recommend a follow up with your surgeon as soon as possible to ensure that you do not have an infection. Thank you and I hope this helps.

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Post surgical issues after chin implant

+1

There are several issues that are shown in your photos. If you experience sutures protruding out of the skin then this should be addressed soon. Exposed sutures can cause local irritation and persistant inflammation and delay proper scar healing. The overall chin areas are still quite swollen and slightly red. You need to go back to your plastic surgeon and have him or her look at it. If the swelling or redness is getting worse or you are having drainage from the incision then the issue may be more serious.

Best Wishes,

Stewart Wang, MD FACS, Wang Plastic Surgery

Stewart Wang, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

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Chin Augmentation Incision

+1

 

Dear Linney, I would see your surgeon as soon as possible. No, it is not normal to have protruding sutures and this is probably the cause for the appearance of the incision. The sutures are coming out from under the skin and this is causing irritation and redness to the incision. The incision is a little larger then what I personally do however I am not sure what type of implant was placed during your procedure. Your surgeon is the one to contact and discuss these issues as he/she knows what was done during your operation. I give all of my surgery patient's my cell number so they may contact me at anytime after surgery with questions and most surgeons are happy to take calls and see their post operative patients often. I am sure your surgeon would want to know you have sutures that are "spitting". I hope this finds you healing better and best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 127 reviews

Chin implant surgery

+1

Dear Linney107,

  • Does that hurt at all?
  • Also, it looks a little red, is it warm to touch?
  • You should go see your surgeon for a checkup and have him address these concerns for you
  • You just want to make sure it isn't infected

Best regards,

Nima Shemirani

Nima Shemirani, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Hello

+1

 

 

In our practice we don’t do revision so soon after surgery. This question is hard to answer; the best person to address this would be your PS. From your picture we can treat you. Sorry

 

 

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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