How long do I have to wait for a Breast Augmentation & a rhinoplasty after giving birth?

Can it be done 3 months after baby?

Doctor Answers (6)

When?

+2
Thank you for the question.



Normally, it's a waiting period of 6 months after child birth. This is just to give your body gain everything that it lost with pregnancy.


Dr. Campos


Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 184 reviews

Post parting surgery

+2
Generally speaking, one should wait 6 months after nursing for any breast surgery.  
Lifting and caring got an infant may be difficult for a couple weeks after surgery. 

Duncan Miles, MD
Redlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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How long should I wait to have breast surgery after giving birth?

+2
Thank you for your question.  This is a very common question that women have.  One thing that you have not mentioned is whether you are breast feeding.  It is important to wait a minimum of 3 months after you finish breast feeding and often I recommend waiting 6 months to allow the milk production to cease, allow the breast to return to it's pre-breast feeding volume (which may often be smaller) and allow the skin to retract and assume it's new shape.  You don't want to find out that you need a lift after your augmentation and you don't want to have the chance of having a milk collection around the implant, this can lead to infection.  Best to give the breast time to recover and you will end up with the best result possible.

Brian C. Reuben, MD
Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
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Wait until you are done breast-feeding and no longer producing milk before breast augmentation after pregnancy

+2
There are significant changes that occur in your breast after pregnancy and after you have finished breast-feeding.  The breast gland will "involute" which means that the gland becomes smaller.  When the gland becomes smaller the breast may sag.

It is important that these changes have been completed before having breast augmentation.  The reason is that if you have breast augmentation too early and the breast continues to become smaller and sag, then the full benefit of your breast augmentation will not be apparent.

Of course it varies with each individual, however post partum breast changes can continue for 6 months or longer.  One method of making a decision is to consider your breast augmentation when you have stopped producing milk and stopped lactating.  This can occur any time between 3 months and 12 months.

There really are few limitations on when you can have your rhinoplasty.  Any time after 3 months should be okay.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Finish breastfeeding, then wait 3-6 months

+1
Congratulations on your new baby! With it come many joys and also some changes of your body that you do not like. Most patients in the United States do not breastfeed. If you have chosen to breastfeed, then I recommend you finish breastfeeding and wait 3 to 6 months until your baby weight has gone away and your breast shape has achieved its natural outcome from stopping breastfeeding. Typically 3 months after you stop breastfeeding for patients who are already on a regular diet with their active life is enough time for you to achieve a natural appearance of your breast. At that point you can make good decisions about your breast implant choice.

Regarding your rhinoplasty, the timing of your rhinoplasty is pretty much your decision. Some of the estrogen that you have at the end of your pregnancy can make your tissues a bit more supple and appear more swollen. So, I typically ask patients to wait 2 to 3 months just to get their routine down with their new baby before undertaking a rhinoplasty after their delivery. The combination of rhinoplasty and breast surgery is a common undertaking and in your consultation I can discuss those details with you.

Paul Vanek, MD
Cleveland Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.