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What Type of Surgeries This Nose Needs?

I have an upturned and loose tip (so loose that it can flip left-right) which I'd like to tighten and lower a bit. I have a deviated septum and a bump in the bone at the root which sticks out to the sides. The nostrils are big, flared and too wide, especially when smiling (see 3rd pic) but the base itself doesn't seem wide. I'd like to make it more angular, more defined and symmetrical. Thank you for your suggestions.

Doctor Answers (5)

Nose Surgery, Rhinoplasty

+2

You did not mention if you had nose surgery before or not. The type of rhinoplasty/septoplasty ,all depends on whether you had a previous nasal surgery or not . If this is your first  time considering reshaping your nose and improve your airway, I suggest to have a septoplasty ( submucous resection ) to correct your septal deviation, while undergoing a rhinoplasty. You do not need lenghening your nose (lowering ) . You would benefit from sculpturing of the tip, reduction of your bony hump and very conservative Wier incisions to reduce your flaring of the nostrils. All of these could be achieved by a close technic, under general or local anesthesia as out patient. An experienced plastic surgeon could perform this surgery under 2 hours. 

Web reference: http://mahjouricosmeticsurgery.com

Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Recommendations for your nose

+1

Your nose has a few issues that need to be addressed. Have you had your nose operated on previously? It looks like it. The bridge of your nose appears to have an open roof deformity and needs to be narrowed by breaking the nasal bones. You have a bump just above the tip of your nose that sometimes can occur from a previous rhinoplasty, but this is easy to fix by just shaving down the excess cartilage in that spot. The flaring of your nostrils cam be corrected by an alar wedge resection of each nostril. This involves an external incision of a wedge of skin two or three millimeters wide where the nosril meets the cheek. The scar is well hidden and is almost always imperceptible. Whether this is a primary or secondary rhinoplasty my recommendations would be the same. Good luck.

Web reference: http://edelsonplastic.com/face/rhinoplasty/

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Test

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Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Rhinoplasty for the short nose.

+1

Rhinoplasty for the short nose which you have involves grafting skin and cartilage from the ear to do this and at the same time the asymmetries you have can be improved. This is an advanced technique so make sure you see an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Septorhinoplasty surgery would be suggested

+1
A septorhinoplasty deals with both the function "septo" and the cosmetic aspects "rhinoplasty." The septoplasty portion will help deal with the deviated septum which may be affecting your breathing and the rhinoplasty will address the cartiliges in your tip which need refinement. Weir surgery is done to help reduce the size of the nostrils and would be done in conjunction if needed to make the nose aesthetically pleasing. In doing your nose it is important that you find a good qualified rhinoplasty surgeon who fully knows how to do the surgery properly and give you a nice natural appearance. You do not want your nose shortened or turned up anymore so you can keep a nice masculine looking appearance to the nose. I use an imaging computer during the consulting phase which allows me to show the patient the proposed surgical result prior to the surgery. Best regards!

Web reference: http://www.michaelelammd.com

Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 110 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.