Ask a doctor

What type of bloodwork do i need before having tummy tuck and liposculpture?

Ill be going over seas at the end of the month to have my surgery done and i wanted to do all my lab here in the states since i have insurance and it will be covered, So i wanted to know what are the names of all the blood test that i need to have for my surgery. If anyone can help please let me know THANKS

Doctor Answers (11)

Overseaes surgery big decision

+1

Considering having a full abdominoplasty done overseas is a big step and I only hope the place chosen for the surgery is a safe and fully accredited facility. On many occasions patient’s decision to travel to another country for plastic surgery is a cost driven only. Many patients forget this type of procedure requires many follow up visits.  Especially the first couple weeks after the procedure is done can be quite intensive as far as recovery for many patients.  Make sure you can see your surgeon as often as you can for the first at least two weeks  Scheduling the surgery requires good research on patient’s part. It is extremely important to check surgeon’s credentials, experience and also results of his work.  Hopefully you did follow through with the above. What is really concerning -you should be informed what is required as far as medical clearance for your procedure.  Are you healthy?  What type of medications you take on daily bases.  What are the anesthesia guidelines for this specific country and facility?  Please ask all important questions so your procedure is a safe one. I hope you will make a right decision.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

What type of bloodwork do i need before having tummy tuck and liposculpture?

+1

Most patients will not need any labwork unless age or medical illness are issues. Call your surgeon's office to find out what if anything they will need. Hopefully they already know your age and medical history.

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Blood Tests Prior To Tummy Tuck

+1

In a perfectly healthy 20 year old woman who wants a tummy tuck, I do not order any labs as this just drives the cost up with little benefit.  In a 50 year old woman with multiple medical problems, there is a long list of tests I would run but I tailor those tests to the patient's medical history.  Unfortunately without knowing your age, weight, medical and surgical history and examining you, I cannot tell you what tests should be done.

Sacha Obaid, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

You might also like...

Type of Bloodwork and Tests Before Tummy Tuck and Liposuction

+1

     I would give a call to the plastic surgeon who will be performing the surgery to determine these items.  The tests needed will vary with age, current medical problems, and personal preference to some extent.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Pre-Op Lab Work Before Tummy Tuck and Liposuction

+1

Generally, when you decide to book surgery, you are given perscription medication as well as lab work that must be done within a certain about of time prior to surgery (typically 7-10 days). It is slightly alarming that the lab work was not given to you, or outlined for you prior to this point. I would caution you to be very careful with traveling out of the country to have plastic surgery. I have seen this done on numerous occassions all with alarming results. Contact the surgeon and outline all pre-operative lab work that needs to be done, because there are various requirements for various patients/procedures.

 

I hope this helps you and good luck

 

Fadi Chahin MD, FACS

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Diplomat, American Board of Surgery

Diplomat, American Board of Plastic Surgery

Fadi Chahin, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Should Cost Outweigh Safety?

+1

Most patients pursue medical tourism for cost considerations. While there are very qualified surgeons abroad, patients typically do not have access to enough information to make an informed choice.  If you have not been educated enough to know what kind of medical workup is required prior to surgery, you should question the prudence of your choice.  All the best.

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Lab Work Before Surgery

+1

If you are already set to go overseas to have surgery and have not been told what lab you need, I would be very worried. Most people who go out of the country to have surgery do so to save money. Sometimes this translates into reducing safety. Not  knowing the required lab work is a safety issue. 

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Labs before procedures overseas

+1

The labs you need depend on your type of anesthesia, your age and your medical issues and symptoms.

Contact your surgeon overseas and find out what labs are needed and if they will accept the results.  If they will, send the results ahead of time to be sure all issues are covered and no medical intervention is needed to get you in tip top shape before your procedure.

Deborah Ekstrom, MD
Worcester Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Pre-op Blood Work

+1

In your case check with your surgeon regarding the tests required.  They will vary depending on your age state of health, etc.  I have all pre-op tests ordered by anesthesiologist as feel this avoids ordering unnecessary tests.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Tummy Tuck and Preoperative Workup?

+1

Thank you for the question, but your preoperative workup ( including  blood tests and/or other necessary tasks)  will vary depending on your age and medical history. You will be best off checking with your plastic surgeon in regards to specific preoperative “requirements”.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.