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Age 22 - Can Drooping Left Eyelid Be Fixed?

My left eye lid droops low when I'm tired and I want to get it fixed. I'm not sure whether it can be fixed or not because it's not a constant problem. Can it? And if so, what would the procedure be called?

Doctor Answers (13)

Ptosis surgery

+2

Drooping eyelids in the older population is very common and is called Ptosis (the P is silent!)   Generally it occurs because the muscle (levator muscle) and its tendon (levator aponeurosis) stretch and thin with time and slip from their natural insertion positions.  Generaly the muscle itself is very healthy and just needs to be reinserted to the appropriate positions with a simple procedure.  

Other times, children are born with a droopy eyelid because the eye muscle doesn't develop correctly and requires a procedure to elevate it.  In this case the muscle is weak from birth and does not really change position.

In both of the above conditions the eyelid is ALWAYS droopy.  An eyelid that becomes droopy only occasionaly may even be a hallmark of something else, rarely a condition that is called myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disorder that causes the muscles to tire out easily.  It is often treated with medications.   Now, as I said this is very rare and you probably don't have this but it may be worthwhile to have some blood work or testing to make sure.   You fall into an unusual age range to have this problem unless you were born with some weakness that you may be able to see in old photographs of yourself. 

If there is no other reason that is causing your variable ptosis, then hopefull you too may be a candidate for ptosis surgery.

 

Good luck,

Jasmine Mohadjer, MD
Oculoplastic Surgeon


Clearwater Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Drooping left eyelid in 22 y.o.

+1
Hard to say without photos or exam. It sounds by your description that you may have drooping, (ptosis) of the eyelid. This can be fixed in most cases.  Each patient is different.  Please see a board certified plastic surgeon, facial plastic surgeon, or oculoplastic surgeon. they will listen to you and do an exam to see if you need a standard blepharoplasty, or an operation to raise your eyelid.

Jeffrey Roth, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Droopy Eyelids

+1

Droopy eyelids can be repaired simultaneously with blepharoplasty. I do this frequently and can be done at the same time. This is called an “eyelid ptosis repair”.

Rod J. Rohrich, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Ptosis Repair

+1

A droopy (ptotic) eyelid that occurs when tired could be a sign of an underlying condition called myasthenia gravis. Myasthenia gravis is a condition that results in weakening of muscles, especially when tired. Since the eyelid muscles are among the most active in the body, ptosis that occurs when tired can be the first sign of myasthenia gravis.

Once this condition has been ruled out , a variety of outpatient procedures that are safe and highly successful are available to repair a drooping eyelid.

Adam J. Cohen, MD
Skokie Oculoplastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Droopy eyelids: investigate then operate

+1

A droopy eyelid can be cosmetically displeasing and may also reduce your field of vision. The 2 most common causes in your age group are either a detached eyelid muscle (following chronic use of contact lenses, trauma or surgery) or a congenital droopy eyelid (which means you were born with it). These causes are not dangerous and require no further investigation. However, I suggest consulting an ophthalmologist to help determine the exact origin of your problem because, in rare cases, a droopy eyelid may be a manifestation of a more serious disease, such as certain neurological or muscular conditions that can lead to other, sometimes life threatening complications. Thankfully, this is rare. Once the cause has been established, the droopy eyelid can be treated with either medication or more commonly, surgery. The final result can often be spectacular. Good luck!

Patrick Boulos, MD
Montreal Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Ptosis Evaluation

+1

Ptosis of they eyelid can be repaired at any age. The more important question is "Why does your eyelid droop?".

Ptosis has many causes, it can be congenital, due to trauma, contact lenses or aging. However, ptosis can be a sign of neurologic  or muscular disease. If your eyelid only droops when you are tired it could be an early sign of myasthenia (a muscle weakness disease). Sudden onset of ptosis could be caused by damage to a nerve that helps open the eyelid (Horner's Syndrome). Any new ptosis should be evaluated be an Oculoplastic Surgeon to make sure there is no disease that needs to be addressed. After that, a surgcial repair can be performed.

David Schlessinger, MD
Long Island Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Repair of drooping eyelid

+1
It sounds as though you have a congenital laxity of one of the two muscles that keeps the lid elevated. This is easily repaired. See a surgeon with significant experience in ptosis repair.

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Age 22 - Can Drooping Left Eyelid Be Fixed?

+1

Best to see a boarded plastic surgeon in person to examine your eyelid issue. Over the internet very difficult to give accurate info.Droopy eyelid is PTOSIS (from Greek Ptosis or πτῶσις, to "fall") is a (drooping) of the upper or lower eyelid. The drooping may be worse after being awake longer, when the individual's muscles are tired. This condition is sometimes called "lazy eye". Classification is as follows:
Neurogenic ptosis which includes oculomotor nerve palsy, Horner's Syndrome, Marcus Gunn jaw winking syndrome, IIIrd cranial nerve misdirection.
Myogenic ptosis which includes myasthenia gravis, myotonic dystrophy, ocular myopathy, simple congenital ptosis, blepharophimosis syndrome
Aponeurotic ptosis which may be involutional or post-operative.
Mechanical ptosis which occurs due to edema or tumors of the upper lid
Neurotoxic ptosis which is a classic symptom of envenomation[9] by elapids such as cobras,[10] or kraits.[11] Bilateral ptosis is usually accompanied by diplopia, dysphagia and/or progressive muscular paralysis. Regardless, neurotoxic ptosis is a precursor to respiratory failure and eventual suffocation caused by complete paralysis of the thoracic diaphragm. It is therefore a medical emergency and immediate treatment is required.
pseudo ptosis due to:1-Lack of lid support:Empty socket or atrophic globe. 2-Higher lid position on the other side:

So you see to understand your ptosis leads to the correct tretment.

Best from MIAMI Dr. Darryl J. Blinski

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Ptosis (droopy lid)

+1

Yes, your eyelid(s) can be corrected or improved with surgery.  It is called ptosis surgery, under local anesthesia in an outpatient setting.  I recommend a consultation with an oculoplastic surgeon.

Dr Taban

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Eyelid Ptosis (Blepharoptosis) can be Repaired

+1

Dear Fresno, you are describing one eyelid that becomes more droopy as the day goes along.  Many times the other eyelid is also affected, but less noticeable.

  • Before undergoing a surgery though, several medical causes for droopy eyelids (such as myasthenia gravis) should be investigated by your doctor.  
  • You need to be seen and examined by a Facial Plastic Surgery, Ophthalmologist, or Plastic Surgeon who may get your primary care doctor involved.
  • If those causes are ruled out, then you can proceed with a ptosis repar.  

Eyelid ptosis repair can be very effective, but sometimes requires treatment to both eyelids. 

Best Wishes

Travis T. Tollefson, MD, MPH
Sacramento Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.