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Is It Possible to a Tummy Tuck Scar and C Section Scar to Create 1 Scar?

Had a tummy tuck 6 years ago and just had a C Section 5 weeks ago. the area in between the two scars feel hard to the touch and also feels very tightand swollen when i stretch is it possible to remove the area of skin and create 1 scar as it is very uncomfortable and unsightly as can be seen beneath my clothes i must also add that i have managed to lose all pregnancy weight gain and apart from area between the 2 scars my tummy has almost returned to normal aside from a little muscle seperation

Doctor Answers (8)

Tummy tuck and C-section scars can usually be combined

+2

Too bad they didn't use the abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) scar for the C-section but there are of course other priorities when delivering a baby. It is likely that the area between the scars has poor blood circulation and at some piont removing the skin to close it along the existing tummy tuck scar (if it is lower) will probably be in order. You will need to wait until the timing is right.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Tummy tuck and C section scar

+2

It is likely possible to combine and consolidate the scars into one, but probably best to wait until the C-section scar is more completely healed before proceeding.

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

C-section after Tummy Tuck

+1

Thank you for your question.

Congratulations on your successful pregnancy and weight loss!  Whether or not if it is possible to combine the two scars will depend on a physical examination and the amount of tissue laxity that exists. Consultation in person with a well experienced, board certified plastic surgeon is indicated.

I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 718 reviews

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Is It Possible to a Tummy Tuck Scar and C Section Scar to Create 1 Scar?

+1

The easy answer is yes, but over the internet very hard to advise without even a posted photo. allow time for healing than determine in person with a boarded PS if this can be done. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
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Two scars into one

+1

Congratulations on your new baby!  A photo of your abdomen would be helpful, but excising the skin between your two abdominal scars should be possible.  The c-section scar is still healing and any revisions should be put off for a few more months when the tissues have calmed down.  See a board certified plastic surgeon.  You may be a candidate for a mini-abdominoplasty.

Lori H. Saltz, MD
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C-section and Tummy Tuck

+1

It is necessary to allow the c section to heal   6-9 months is probably the minimum. 

When the tissues are soft,  and the skin is loose enought.  it may be possible to remove the skin between to create one scar.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
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Scars of abdomen

+1

I would give the area a chance to heal additionally, and then yes the 2 scars should be able to be combined into one scar. It may benefit you to have a mini-abdominoplasty if necessary at the same time just to tighten the muscle layer a little if indicated.

Rick Rosen, MD
Norwalk Plastic Surgeon
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2 abdominal scars

+1

It may be possible to improve your situation, but it's hard to give surgical advice without photos.  It is, however, too early to consider doing a revision since you are only 5 weeks from the c-section.  The tightness and swelling will likely improve somewhat over the coming weeks.   Seek out a board certified plastic surgeon for a consultation once the healing process has stabilized and you are ready! 

Michelle Spring, MD
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.