I Had my Tummy Tuck, my Tummy Feel So Funny, Feels Like There is Air Between the Skin?

I had Tummy tuck,breast lift with implants and inverted nipples fixed.Tummy looks better its a bit swolen or I dont know what to call it.Its not red and scar looks good,but my tummy feels very funny.If I touch the right side it looks like air moving left.Could it be because it is still swolen?I payed to get my nipples fixed,the Dr said he stuggled getting my nipples out,after taking the plasters of my nipples is still inverted?Im really dissapointed what can I do? This has always been my issue:(

Doctor Answers (5)

Air moving under skin after tummy tuck

+1

if it looks like a wave of "air" moving beneath your skin it may actually be a fluid wave that needs to be drained. If so, that should be done promptly so it doesn't build up. The success of the repair of inverted nipples is dependent on how bad the inversion was. If the nipples could never be manually everted, this would be a class 3 inversion and correction can sometimes be very difficult. Discuss with your surgeon.


Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Tummy Tuck Recovery Issues

+1

Following abdominalplasty, there is a 2 year period during which the sensory nerves to the abdominal skin are re-growing.   During this period there will be some areas of numbness especially between the new belly button and the pubic area.   This skin has been fully elevated and the small sensory nerves are cut during the surgery.   With time many of these little nerves will regrow and sensation will return.  

Swelling of the abdomen also takes some time to fully resolve.   Generally by 3 months the majority of the swelling is resolved; however, if a patient has a long day on her feet, she may still experience some swelling for the first year.

Carlin Vickery, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Mommy Makeover

+1

You sound like you are still healing.  I would allow at least 2-3 months for healing to be complete, then evaluate your  surgery.

Vivek Bansal, MD
Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Potential seroma and inverted nipple repair

+1

It sounds like you are describing a seroma (fluid accumulation between the underlying tissues). It is normal for you to have some swelling post-op surgery. Do continue close follow up with your surgeon.

Inverted nipples can cause functional problems and emotional concerns for both sexes. An inverted nipple can look flat or a slit like depression or hole at the normal nipple location. There are different degrees of inverted nipples possible. Correction of inverted nipples depends on the problem. The objective is to reshape the nipple and areola so that the nipple projects out from the breast, enhancing the appearance of the breast while preserving sensitivity of the nipple. Potential risks include the loss of sensation, inability to breast feed and reoccurrence of the inversion.
On this site, I do my best to give advice without a physical examination but I want you to know that a physical examination by a board certified physician is always the best way to get the most accurate information.
 

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

Persistence of inverted nipples; abdominal contour problem

+1

It sounds like you have a fluid collection under the abdominal skin flap.  An easy fix is aspiration in the doctor's office.  Reaccumulation of fluid may require several aspirations or the placement of a drain for a while.

The inverted nipples should only need to be fixed once.  The contracted ducts need to be cut and sutures need to be placed at the nipple base for about 4-6 weeks.  This can usually be done quite easily in the office under local anesthesia.

Daniel Greenwald, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.