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Is a tummy tuck safe if you have had c-section complications?

I have had two c sections an with my last I tore internally. My doctor said that I have a lot of Scar tissue will this be an issue if I decide to get a tummy tuck? I don't like pain and I'm scared :) Also do most plastic surgeons offer financing?

Doctor Answers (11)

Tummy Tuck removes the excess scarring of C-Sections!

+1

It is healthy to be scared of elective cosmetic surgery - that makes you normal!

As for the procedure- scar tissue created by the c-section is carefully removed during a tummy tuck. The muscles which stretched out during pregnancy are put back together and excess fat is removed - be nervous but get excited for an amazing transformation.

Good Luck!


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Tummy Tuck after C-section

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Having a tummy tuck after c-sections is very common. In fact, having a c-section often creates issues with scars and overhanging skin that make the tummy tuck necessary.  If you have excess scarring, your plastic surgeon will be able to work around it and some of the scar will be removed with the excess overhanging skin.  A wound healing complication after c-section can occasionally cause a hernia and your plastic surgeon and OB should examine you carefully to rule out a hernia before proceeding with your tummy tuck.

Nia Banks, MD, PhD
Washington Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Tummy Tuck After Csection is Common

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A tummy tuck is commonly performed on women who have undergone c-section(s) previously.  A tummy tuck can be an effective tool for shaping and sculpting the body for better body appearance and improved self esteem. Sometimes no amount of diet and exercise can create a flat tummy. Tummy tuck plastic surgery actually tightens abdominal muscles and removes excess fat and skin from the stomach area to create a tighter, slimmer, smoother belly. A tummy tuck can be combined with other procedures such as liposuction of your waists or flanks (i.e. love handles) to fine tune your result

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 113 reviews

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Previous C-section issues should have no impact on a tummy tuck

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The issues that you had with regard to your C-sections should have no bearing on the performance or outcome of a tummy tuck - as long as they were not reflective of a health problem of yours such as diabetes. A tremendous number of tummy tucks are performed in women who had previous C- sections and without any consequence.

Make sure that you have your surgery with a board certified plastic surgeon with a good reputation. Many do offer various financing options.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Common situation with tummy tuck

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The scar tissue should not be an issue. It is commonly encountered during this procedure. It is removed  from the surface of the abdominal fascia. If there is wide separation of the of the muscles ( diastasis) this can be repaired during the procedure.

Regarding financing, many plastic surgery offices provide that. 

Moneer Jaibaji, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

C-section Scars and Tummy Tucks

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Tummy tucks are frequently performed after C-sections, and the C-section scar is not a problem. The portion of the C-section scar in the skin and underlying fat is removed with the skin of the lower abdomen as a routine part of the tummy tuck (abdominoplasty). Irregularities in the scar, and depression of the skin under the scar can be improved. 

Joseph Mele, MD
Walnut Creek Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Tummy Tuck after C-Section Complications

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What happened beneath the muscle has no bearing on Tummy Tuck surgery. You should do well if you have no other medical problems that can affect the surgery (such as smoking, previous leg clots, etc). Pain is usually minimal. The worst is more of an aching of the back after a few days. This resolves as soon as you can stand straight (about a week). Most Plastic Surgery offices do, now, offer financing. The only way to know is with a direct consult. Make an appointment with a Plastic Surgeon soon.
 

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

C-section complications unlikely to affect tummy tuck

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The scar and internal tears after your c-section should not affect a tummy tuck. The goal of the tummy tuck is correction of the loose and lax skin, and approximation of the sit-up muscles, areas which are not affected by internal scars. Often a contacted c-section scar will be improved with the tummy tuck.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Tummy Tuck after c section complications

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The tummy tuck is a superficial procedure. It does not enter the abdominal cavity. The scar tissue we would encounter at the time of the operation is above the muscle and this is easily removed during the procedure. The muscle would then be tightened restoring a more youthful contour to your abdomen.

I would discuss the details of the C section complications with your surgeon but I fully expect these will not interfere with your contouring surgery.

Good luck and I hope this was helpful.

Robert W. Kessler, MD, FACS
Corona Del Mar Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

C-Section complications

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A tummy tuck is a surface surgery that involves removing excess skin, tightening the abdominal muscles, and ma involve varying degrees of liposuction. The fact that you had a difficult course after your C- section should not affect the conduct of the tummy tuck surgery, If there is excessive scar tissue in the skin and subcutanous regions of your lower abdomen, then this can usually be removed at the time of the tummy tuck. There are many patients that have had C- sections who go on to have tummy tucks, and are extremly pleased with the result

Wilfred Brown, MD
Fairfield Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.