Ask a doctor

Tummy Tuck to Correct Problems from Multiple Surgery Scarring?

Hi! My question is a little complicated. I have had several abdominal surgeries: 3 children/all c-section, 2 colon surgeries, hysterectomy, etc. My stomach (from the navel down) is a patchwork of scars. I experience alot of pain around my navel area, and was told it was possibly due to adhesions. Would a tummy tuck remove all of that and help me? If not, what do you recommend to help? I am very embarassed about my body. Thank you for your time!

Doctor Answers 27

Tummy tuck and removing scars

A tummy tuck will remove most of the scarring below your bely button.  There is always a small chance that your bely button might not be able to be preserved.  This procedure would really improve the appearance of your abdomen.  Best of luck.

Using an abdominoplasty to remove multiple lower abdominal scars

If all of your scars are from the umbilicus down then these can be converted to a low transverse scar.  This is not an uncommonly requested procedure and works quite well.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Tummy tuck after multiple surgeries on the abdomen

You could have a great looking tummy after a tummy tuck with most of the old scars removed and a nice, flat result.

However, you need to lose weight first because from your photo you are not presently a good candidate. Also, the pain you experience, if it is from adhesions, will still likely be there becausde the TT doesn't go inside your abdomen to address anything inside.

Good luck!

Tummy Tuck and inside the belly Scarring

A tummy tuck (abdominoplasty) gives the best results in non-obese individuals who are at a stable weight and who do not plan on having more children. The operation will remove the skin and subcutaneous fat from the belly button to the pubis, flatten the tummy by putting the rectus (six pack) muscles together, narrow the waist and lift a sagging pubis.

But - the operation will do nothing for recurrent intraabdominal pain from presumed adhesions. If symptomatic (recurrent bouts of nausea and vomiting etc) they may need to be released surgically.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 78 reviews

Scars

Hello , thank you for presenting us your case . After all these surgeries it is where our work begins. The scars that are below your navel will be removed if you do a TT . Besides this great benefit the repair of the muscles of the abdminal wall can be made to get you a better figure.

Derby Sang, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Abdominoplasty may remove your scars

For the right candidate, abdominoplasty can remove the skin below the umbilicus, stretching the upper abdominal skin down tight and flat.  If you are a candidate for this, abdominoplasty would likely remove the scars that are bothering you.  Your umbilical discomfort is a more difficult thing to predict.  Because the pathways generating your pain are complex, it is difficult to know whether changing the skin around the umbilicus will decrease or increase your discomfort.  A board certified plastic surgeon will likely be able to discuss your specific anatomy and provide you with a good expectation of how your body may be affected by an abdominoplasty.

A tummy tuck can correct the scars below your belly button.

Although a tummy tuck can improve existing scar appearance, the procedure may not address or resolve the pain you’re experiencing as a result of adhesions. This is because adhesions are scar tissue inside of the abdominal cavity, and the surgical area addressed by a tummy tuck remains above the muscle layer. Given your medical history, it’s in your best interest to consult with a general surgeon to determine the cause for your pain. A board certified plastic surgeon can help to improve the appearance of your stomach through abdominoplasty, but cannot relieve your adhesion-related pain. You’ll get the best results from a tummy tuck when you are at your target weight and can continue to maintain that weight post-surgery.

Correction of scars following abdominal surgery

Thank you for your question.  Tummy tuck would likely eliminate your present scars below your belly button, but trade them for the traditional tummy tuck scar - low and curved, along the full width of the abdomen, in addition to a scar around the belly button itself.  Tummy tuck would also flatten the abdomen, remove overhanging skin and fat, and, with liposuction, narrow and contour the waistline.  Abdominal pain due to adhesions from prior surgery, however, would not be addressed.  These adhesions are thin bands of scar tissue between and around the intestines - tummy tuck does not involve intervention inside the abdominal cavity itself.  In short, tummy tuck would be a nice option to improve your appearance; it would not, however, address your pain.

Joshua D. Zuckerman, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Scars below the belly button should be removed

Because of the way a tummy tuck is performed, most of the scarring below the belly button should be removed along with the excess skin. Although you’ll be left with a longer, single scar from the tummy tuck itself, this is usually positioned low enough on the abdomen to be hidden by a swimsuit and most women feel the trade-off of their improved figure is well worth having a discreetly placed scar. However, a tummy tuck isn’t going to address the presence of any adhesions, as these develop further within the abdomen than a tummy tuck addresses.

Tummy Tuck to Correct Problems from Multiple Surgery Scarring

A tummy tuck should improve the scarring. The degree that can be expected is more predictable after an in person consultation and examination. Consult with 3 board certified plastic surgeons to understand your options, and choose the one that best fits your needs/objectives.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.