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Tummy Tuck, Liposuction, Neck Lift Too Much in One Day?

I've had a consultation with a Canadian plastic surgeon. He states that his incisions are low and straight across for the Tummy Tuck. There are other women who have posted that their incision is higher than expected. Also, we have not discussed the belly button, which seems to be an issue for other gals who have posted on their Tummy Tuck. Maybe I need to ask more questions. He also will be doing Liposuction on my outer thighs and a neck lift. Is this too much surgery for one day?

Doctor Answers (11)

Multiple Procedures

+2

As long as you are healthy combining those surgeries together should not pose excessive risks.

As far as the incisions go for abdominoplasty, I use a slightly curved incision as that allows the removal of more skin and less puckering of the skin than does a straight line. Incisions are ideally placed low so that they are hidden well. The belly button is a crucial step in this surgery and every surgeon has a different way of performing the belly button part.

Good luck.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Combination Surgery Safe?

+1

Thank you for the question. Combination surgical procedures are done on a routine basis. However,  it is best to evaluate each patient on an individualized basis. During this consultation process, after a complete history and physical, the SAFETY  of combining these surgical procedures becomes of paramount importance.  Factors such as selection of plastic surgeon,  exact procedures planned, estimated blood loss, duration of surgery,  recovery considerations, anesthesia provider, duration of surgery, surgery facility are all important  considerations.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

Safer to have surgeries done on separate days

+1

Yes, those are three operations that are probably going to take the surgeon more than five hours to perform and should be probably done separately. There is a higher incidence of having deep venous thrombosis and a blood clot in the leg after these types of procedures related to the time length of the anesthetic and surgery. It is probably a good idea to have those three operations done on separate days.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

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Neck lift and lipo is not too much for one day

+1

The amount of surgery really depends on the individual patient. However, tummy tuck, lipo and neck lift is generally not too much for one day as long as they keep the surgery less than 6 hours and you are in good health and under the care of competent anesthesiologists and staff. As for the incisions, you need to discuss the operative plan with your surgeon prior to the surgery so you are both on the same page. Good luck with your surgery.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
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Neck lift, tummy tuck and liposuction combined

+1

A neck lift can be combined with a tummy tuck and liposuction. It all depends upon how extensive the works is?  I would say limiting surgical times to about 6 hours is pretty safe for a healthy patient.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

The risk of surgery increases with more procedures

+1

Mare55

The one thing we have learned is that the risk of death increases with longer operative time and combined procedures. What can't be answered is precisely is how much does adding these additional procedures increase your personal risk.

The rationale for combining procedures is it is the first hour of anesthesia that is the most expensive. Recovery time runs somewhat in parallel expect that you will be much sicker after surgery when all these surgeries are combines than when they are done separately. Will you get away with the combination surgery? Statistics suggest that your risk of mortality is perhaps on the order of 1:5000 have combination surgery like this.

Putting this in perspective, the risk dying in a crashing when you fly on a commercial jet is one in 3 million. Don't ask your surgeon how much risk you are willing to take. General plastic surgeons are initially trained as general surgeons. Some have a very skewed view of what an acceptable risk is. Recognize that even with a very high mortality rate of 1 in 5000 cases, this is still infrequent enough that a surgeon can go an entire career without an operative death. Reduce your risk by doing less surgery. Don't have a "neck lift" at the time of the liposuction and tummy tuck.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Tummy tuck, lipo, and neck lift as a combined procedure

+1

These 3 procedures can safely be done at the same time, but the key is to make sure that you are personally a good candidate for it, both anatomically and from an overall health standpoint. In other words, if you are otherwise healthy, no hear problems, don't smoke, etc, and are not going to require a large volume of fat to be removed, you should do very well. This ultimately comes down to the judgment of the surgeon, and if you are unsure, you should seek another opinion from a surgeon in your area, simply to get another viewpoint.

Good luck!

Dr. S

Shahram Salemy, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Not necessarily

+1

You and your surgeon should always put safety as your number one concern. While it may be possible to do all of the procedures in one sitting, you and your surgeon need to look at total anesthesia time, total expected blood loss, total surface area of surgical trauma, general health and relative risks, time in one position, recovery regimen, post-op care available, etc. In addition, while you might plan to have all of these procedures done at the same sitting, you must plan for "outs" where the surgery can be terminated if the surgeon feels uncomfortable or the surgery/anesthesia does not proceed as planned. For this, you need to prioritize your procedures (which area is the most important?) and your surgeon must make clear to you under what circumstances and at what point might he curtail the procedure in the interest of safety so that you will not be surprised or disappointed.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Multiple Surgeries

+1

Longer periods of anesthesia are accompanied by an increase risk of complications. I personally would not perform a TT, liposuction you describe, and a neck lift at the same time. You and your surgeon must weigh the cost benefits vs risks. You definitely need to have another consultation to ask your questions.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Multiple Procedures

+1

The one thing I stress to all patients who go in for a consultation is to ASK QUESTIONS! If necessary, go in with a list. If your doctor is offended or too busy to address your questions, go somewhere else. The more you know about your procedure, the indications, alternatives, potential risks and complications, expected results, post surgical care and limitations, as well as how close can your doctor come to what you desire, the more confident you will be with your decision. I am surprised by the number of patients who come to me from other surgeons who say that "I didn't know" or "he didn't tell me" this and that. You are your own best advocate. Of course, sometimes there is to much information or you forget one detail or another, but it doesn't hurt to return for a second visit if needed before making a decision.

Your physician, if board certified in plastic surgery, certainly can evaluate your medical history and do an examination and determine what the limits should be on the number of procedures to do at once. He knows what needs to be done and knows how much time it will take and what the post op limitations may be and whether they will conflict. So trust your surgeon or get a second opinion.

Theodore Katz, MD, FACS
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.