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Peeling Cream to Remove Tummy Tuck Scar?

I had my Tummy Tuck 8 months ago. The scar is flat and I thought it was healing correctly but it is really dark. It is about 1/4" thick and clear in the middle but dark on the edges. Reading on the internet, I think this is called hyperpigmentation. I am trying a cream with Vitamin A and hydroquinone, and so far has peeled the first layer of skin but the darkness of the scar is still there. Will this ever go away? Am I going to keep this scar looking this dark forever? Am I doing the right thing? Thanks.

Doctor Answers (2)

Hyperpigmentation tends to get better over time.

+1

Hyperpigmentation has many causes and depending on the reason, it may take variable amounts of time to resolve but generally it does improve over time. This may take up to two years.

In the meantime, strictly avoid sun exposure which can make this worse.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

No tanning after Tummy Tuck!

+1

You certainly are describing what sounds like hyperpigmentation of your surgical scar. It might be a normal amount after surgery, which can take up to 12 months to fade, or it is a potentially permanent situation.

The most important thing for you to do first is to avoid sun exposure or tanning booths. This amount of UV radiation can permanently darken the scar. So be careful.

Bleaching agents such as hydroquinone help discourage pigment formation, and are a mainstay of treatment for hyperpigmentation. There are lasers, intense pulsed light machines that help draw out the pigment in situations where nothing else has worked and the changes are permanent.

Hang in there and be sure to communicate these concerns with your plastic surgeon.

Brian K. Brzowski, MD
Ogden Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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