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Do I Have Tubular / Tuberous Deformity and Can It Be Fixed with Breast Implants? (photo)

I'm pretty sure that I have tubular breast deformity. I am 22 years old and I have always been very self-conscious about the way my breasts look. I want to feel beautiful in my own skin and right now I don't even feel comfortable taking my bra off in front of my very supportive long-term boyfriend. I have been considering breast implants for a long time and I would like to know if that would help my condition at all. I've been considering B/C size, saline, submuscular implants.

Doctor Answers (13)

Very Minimal Tuberous Breast Easily Corrected with Breast Implants

+3

Thank you for your question. Your breasts are very near normal shape. There is a very slight constriction worse on the right Breast.

Breast Implants can easily achieve the shape that you want.

The key is to find a surgeon who is familiar with treating the Tubular Shaped Breast.

My view is that it is important to release the constricting bands from the inside through a sub glandular dissection.

In my experience a sub glandular Breast Augmentation will give you the best result.

Web reference: http://drseckel.com/boston-breast-implants/breast-implants-for-tubular-breasts-correct-tuberous-breast-deformity-2/

Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Mildly Tuberous Breasts

+1

The photos suggest a mild form of tubular breasts which can be improved with appropriate breast implants plus a periareolar mastopexy. Consult with 3 - 4 experienced and expert board certified plastic surgeons to review your options. 

West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Breast implants

+1

Your breasts are only mildly tuberous. If you have implants alone, some of the tuberous nature of the breasts will still be present, but overall, I think you would het a nice result with the implants and not need additional work done.

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

A bi-planar augmentation will correct your tubular breasts

+1
Based on your photos, you certainly show some of the classic characteristics of tuberous breasts.  The inferior pole is slightly constricted with a relatively short, base of the areola to infra-mammary fold distance.  What is most classic is the herniation of tissue into the retroareolar place.  This can certainly be corrected with a bi-planar augmentation to give great emphasis the lower pole.

What is even more important is a small periareolar mastopexy and debulking of retroareolar tissue.  One of the unfortunate side effects of a periareola mastopexy (Benelli) is that it can result in some flattening of the periareolar complex. In a case such as yours, this works to your benefit, in that it further helps diminish the protuberance of the nipple areola. 

In the hands of an experienced surgeon, for your problem you can expect and excellent and very pleasing result.

The link below is to a recent tuberous breast surgery patient of mine who shared her before & after photos on realself. Hope you find it helpful.

Web reference: http://www.realself.com/review/new-york-breast-augmentation-tuberous-breasts

Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Do I Have Tubular / Tuberous Deformity and Can It Be Fixed with Breast Implants?

+1

Thanks for the posted photos. Yes you have a mild to moderate tuberous deformity. Just implantation alone will not correct you will need additional techniques to achieve a result that would be good. Seek in person examinations from boarded PSs in your area. 

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Tuberous breasts

+1

It looks like fromt he photos that you have a midl form especially on the right.  This may require some tightening of the areola alon and /or scoring of the parenchyma when placing implants. An exam in person would be best. Good luck.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Tuberous Breasts

+1

Thanks for the question -

 

As the other experts have indicated your photos show elements of tuberous breasts (herniating tissue around areola and breast constriction).  There are multiple techniques that can be used to address this.  Much of what's right for you depends of the look you are trying to achieve.  Almost all techniques will require some release of the constricted tissue.

I hope this helps!

Web reference: http://www.trivalleyplasticsurgery.com

San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Tuberous breasts?

+1

From the photos you sent, I think you would do well with a subglandular placement of a gel-filled implant.  With this approach, expansion of any breast tissue constriction can be done easily.

Bellevue Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Do I Have Tubular / Tuberous Deformity and Can It Be Fixed with Breast Implants?

+1

You do have a mild form of tuberous breasts, with a larger areola with "pseudoherniation" of tissue beneath it giving a "pooch-y" look to the areola.  Breast implants would help shape the breast, but you may require a periareolar lift with a circular scar around the areola to reduce its size and "telescope" the "poochy" areola inward.

Web reference: http://www.seattleplasticsurgery.com/breast-augmentation-surgery.html

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Tuberous or Constricted Breasts

+1

Hello,

Yes you do have a mild form of tuberous breasts.  However, your breast base is a normal diameter, and the skin of your lower pole (below your areola) is not too tight or short.  Additionally, you've got good symmetry.  This means you should get a nice result from augmentation in conjunction with a circumareolar reduction.  It is important that the implant size that is chosen  is not too large, which will make the circumareolar reduction difficult.

Best of luck!

Web reference: http://www.drminniti.com

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.