Fix Tubular Breasts Without Implants?

I have tubular breasts and i want to get them fixed. is there any possibility to fix this without a implant.

Doctor Answers 16

Soft tissue expansion offers best correction of tubular breasts

While a mastopexy/breast lift type of procedure can correct tubular breasts, I have had great difficulty achieving a nice full look, especially medially in the cleavage area without breast implants.

In fact, the most satisfactory results in my practice have been achieved with soft tissue expansion.

The problem is the constricted shape of the breast which is usually worst medially near the cleavage. I find expanding this area has given the best results.

Avoid circumferential incisions and scars around the areola--the scars are horrific.

It would depend on your starting point

All deformities we have come in a spectrum of degrees. No different for tubular breast deformities. So depending on your starting point, it might be possible to go without an implant. However, if you really have a true manifestation of the tubular deformity with lower pole constriction and tissue deficiency, enlarged areolas with herniated breast tissue, and a tight high riding inframammary crease, I personally can't imaging getting a good correction without an implant.

Possible to fix tubular breasts without implants

Tubular breast deformity is diagnosed when three criteria are present:

1. Constricted breast base with lower pole deficiency.

2. Enlarged aerola.

3. Herniating of breast tissue through the areola.

The classic treatment of tubular breast involves a peri-aerolar mastopexy,breast tissue scorring to expand the lower pole and control of the aerolar diameter. An expander or implant is used to add volume to an already deficient lower breast pole.

The procedure could still be done without an exapnder or implant but the results will not be as good. A promising tool could be the use of fat grafting to the lower pole. However, the use of fat injection in the breast of cosmetic use is not recommended yet bu our sister society. There is a lot of un-answered questions regarding future mammagram and cancer detection with the presence of fat. I like to use for post breast reconstruction revisions and it is a wonderful tool.

To summarize, it is possible but results will not be as good. Hope that helps!

Hisham Seify, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Fix tubular breasts without implants?

There are several features involved in the description of a tuberous breast. The base of the breast is usually abnormally narrow. The inframammary fold is usually higher which results in a shortened distance between the nipple and the fold. This results in a constricted or tightened lower pole of the breast. The lower pole is the lower half of the breast. This constriction or tightened breast envelope causes the breast to push forward into the areola as it develops. The areolar skin is more elastic than the surrounding breast skin. Consequently as the breast develops and pushes forward into the areola the appearance of a "puffy" nipple areolar complex develops. This is often described as a "pseudo-herniation" of the breast tissue into the areola. The surgical correction of this problem will depend on how many of these components are present. Some patients present with mild deformities and some have all of the above described features. Correction of the pseudo-herniation of the nipple areolar complex often requires an incision around the areola removing extra skin and tightening the area. This is called a periareolar mastopexy. In order to widen the base of the breast it is often necessary to release bands that have formed at the base of breast allowing it to stretch out over an implant. An implant is normally required to achieve stretching of the base of the breast.

John J. Edney, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Correction of Tuberous Breast

Patients who are correctly diagnosed with tuberous breast deformity, as opposed to patients who have an underdeveloped lower pole of the breast, are best treated surgically with an implant augmentation/reconstruction, in my opinion. Many times such patients benefit from a two stage reconstruction - tissue expansion followed by exchange for a permanent implant. 

As always make sure you consult with a board certified plastic surgeon with particualr experience and expertise in aesthetic breast surgery. Your surgeon should be a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and/or the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic surgery. 

Michael B. Tantillo, MD
Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Seek an experienced plastic surgeon!

Breast implants will give you the best look for this condition, most likely, with the least scarring.  Your situation needs to be evaluated by a plastic surgeon with plenty of experience in this area!

Tubular Breast Correction

Yes, it is possible to fix tubular breasts without getting implants. The constricted tissue will be released and your areolae reduced if necessary. However, please note that the size of your breasts will remain the same or be smaller.

Fix tubular breasts without implants?

Thank you for your question!   The standard procedure would be placement of an implant (or tissue expander, depending on the lower pole of your breast) as well as a circumareolar breast lift.  These modalities would correct the issues with tuberous breast: constricted breast at the inferior pole, via breast prosthetic; scoring of the tissue to release the bands; lowering the inframammary fold; correcting the herniation of breast tissue into the areolae; and decreasing the overall size of the areolae.  These are the hallmarks of tuberous breasts.  You could likely get great results with fat grafting or an implant and likely breast lift.

Consult with a plastic surgeon well-versed in breast surgery and discuss your goals and expectations.  S/he will then be able to examine and discuss the various options and assist you in deciding which decision os the right one for you, given your desires.  I would expect a very pleasing result for you!  Hope that this helps!  Best wishes for a wonderful result!

Lewis Albert Andres, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Tubular breasts

All tubular breasts are not the same in severity and appearance - it is impossible to say whether you would be a good candidate for non-implant reconstruction without examining you. That said, most of us prefer to use several techniques in the correction of tubular breasts, which includes an implant to stretch out the lower half of your breast and add volume there. You may be a candidate for a breast lift with some fat grafting if you are dead set against implants. Your best bet would be to have a consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon in your area to discuss options. Good luck.

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 91 reviews

Tubular Breasts and Augmentation

         Tubular breasts come in all shapes and significant variations in breast contour occur in women with this condition.

         Tubular breasts occur because of constriction of the skin at the base of the breast. This often results in herniation of the breast tissue through the areola which creates a unique breast shape. A variety of approaches may be used to correct this problem. Treatment should be individualized, based on the specifics of the anatomic deformity and aesthetic goals of the patient.

         When patients have mild tubular breast deformities, correction can often occur without an implant. Severe cases of this condition usually require treatment with an implant because of the magnitude of the deformity.

         If you’re concerned about the tubular breast deformity, it’s important to consult a board certified plastic surgeon. This surgeon will develop a treatment plan that not only considers your unique anatomy, but your aesthetic goals as well.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.