Ask a doctor

Do I Have Tuberous Breasts? (photo)

Do I have a tuberous breast deformity and if I do what can be done to fix this? Also, can the size of my aureolas be reduced?

Doctor Answers (10)

Do I Have Tuberous Breasts

+1

No, these are not tuberous breasts. 

There are a number of features that define a tuberous breast:

•Wide and puffy areolae
•widely spaced breasts
•high breast fold
•constricted lower pole (deficient tissue in lower half of the breast
•minimal breast tissue
•high breast fold
•narrow base of the breast

 

I see only large areolas, none other from this list. 

The areolas can be reduced with an incision around each areola.You might want to consider a vertical breast lift which can reduce the areola and can elevate the position of the areola to a more favorable height. All the best. 

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Tuberous breast deformity is very specific

+1

Hi there-

You do not have a tuberous breast deformity.

A more ideal breast shape for you would require a lift of some kind, with or without an implant for more upper pole fill.

Web reference: http://www.DrArmandoSoto.com

Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Tuberous breasts?

+1

Thank you for the question.

 

No you don't have tuberous breasts. Extra large areolae can be reduced with a circular mastopexy. The total cost is $4950 at Lake Tahoe Plastic Surgery.

 

Dr Foster 

 

Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Large areolae

+1

Defenitly you don't have a tuberous breast even though you a large areola in relation to the size of your breast which can be reduced by a minor surery 

Saudi Arabia Plastic Surgeon

Do I Have Tuberous Breasts?

+1

The posted photos show NO tuberous deformity. But as for the large areolars the only reduction method is a circumareolar incision/scar. 

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Not Tuberous Breast

+1

You do not have tuberous breast.  From these photos you appear to need a circumareolar mastopexy to reduce areola diameter.  Also you may need a vertical scar added.  This should be combined with an implant augmentation in order to achieve the optimal beautiful shape for your breasts.  A consultation with a surgeon board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and experienced in breast enhancement surgeries will be able to properly determine what is best for your ideal breast surgery results. 

Dothan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Non-Tuberous Breasts

+1

You most definitely do not have tuberous breasts. Your breast base is very wide with sagging and large areolas. You will need either periarolear or vertical breast lifts depending upon the amount of lifting vs the amount of scar trade-off that you can accept.

Web reference: http://www.eppleyplasticsurgery.com/breast-lift.html

Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Tuberous breasts

+1
You do not have tuberous breasts. You are a good candidate for a periareolar mastopexy (breast lift with scars only around your areola) in addition to areolar reduction. Moreover you would benefit from an internal dermal suspension with the use of your inner skin layer for support.
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Not tuberous breasats

+1

Based upon your photos, it does not look like you have tuberous breasts.  Your breasts look reasonable wide and the tissue is not herniated through the nipple areola complex.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Breast shape question

+1

You do not appear to have tuberous breasts from your photo. To reduce the areola size and improve the shape of your breasts a vertical breast lift may be what you need. Please see several plastic surgeons in consultation to determine what plan and doctor is the best fit for you. Good Luck!

Richmond Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

You might also like...