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Had TT with Muscle Repair and Lipo. Have No Bruising Where the Drain Tubes Were and Have Dog Ears?

Doctor Answers (8)

With newer techniques liposuction can be done on the abdominal flap, the incision extended to avoid dog ears, no drain needed

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While traditionally Plastic Surgeons have avoided doing liposuction on the abdominal flap because of the risk of skin flap loss, the incision is limited and dog ears are accepted, and because there is still undermining of the upper flap which requires drains, there now are ways to answer every one of these problem. With newer techniques the abdominal flap can be thinned with liposuction to make the abdomen look more sculpted, the incision lengthened to give a much more defined waist, and the upper flap not undermined which makes drains not necessary. Please see my published paper in the Journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgery, September 2011. In that article we report on 113 consecutive  cases with lower than standard problem and what I would define as superior results. 

As to your present dog ears, they can be removed with local anesthesia in the office OR. Another way to approach them is to look at you lateral thighs and buttocks and see if there is laxity there, if there is than a later thing and buttock lift would fix not only the dog ears but also correct this lateral thigh and buttock laxity. 


Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Dog ears/

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Dog ears can develop at the ends of the abdominoplasty incision. This can often be treated after about 6 months when things settles down.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Had TT with muscle repair

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  • No bruising near the drain site is good
  • extra skin on the sides will usually resolve on its own
  • if still present after 6 months, can be revised  easily under local anesthesia

 

James Shaw, MD
Wichita Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

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Dog Ears?

+1

These irregularities at the end of an incision are accepted by the surgeon in trying to keep the incision at a reasonable length. Most of the time these resolve in the first 6 months after surgery, though occasionally a minor touch up can be done for the ones that persist.

Thanks for your question, best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Dog ears after tummy tuck

+1

A dog ear is a little fold of skin at the end of the tummy tuck incision and results when trying to keep the scar as short as possible. Often they flatten and smooth out, though on occasion a small revision is needed to resolve them.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Hello

+1

 

 

You did not mention when your surgery was. Dog ears are common and can be fixed after all the swelling subsides. That would be a scar revision if that is what you’re looking for. Not having bruising is fine, your lucky.

 

 

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Tummy Tuck Recovery

+1

No bruising from the drain tubes is normal.

Dog ears are common because - 

  • small dog ears will subside by themselves without treatment
  • trying to avoid dog ears at surgery can make the excision way to long
  • about 10% of tummy tucks need an in-office correction of a dog ear. 
  • Give them time - as swelling goes down, so will the dog ears
  • I correct them in my patients ideally at 6 months but often patients don't want to wait that long - and I do them earlier.

Talk things over with your surgeon to see what his/her approach may be.

Hope this helps!

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Dog Ears After Tummy Tuck

+1

Occasionally, patients will see small areas of extra skin at the corner of their tummy tuck incision. These are called "dog ears." Correction can offen be done in the office with local anesthesia once the swelling has resolved. I encourage you to discuss this with your Plastic Surgeon.

Lawrence Iteld, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.