Treatment options, conservative vs surgical , for upper eyelid wrinkle after 2 (1 week) episodes of eyelid edema? (photos)

I'm a 25 yo F who experienced 2, 1 week episodes of upper eyelid edema including the area right above the upper eyelid, within last 3 months. The 2nd episode I was diagnosed w/ allergic eyelid dermatitis and given topical steroids. It worked well but it seems like the skin above my eyelid was stretched from swelling. It's been a week since symptoms resolved except I have an extra wrinkle above my eyelid that prevents my eye from opening fully. It's very bothersome, I feel like I'm fighting to keep my eye open all day and makes me look tired.

Doctor Answers (7)

Treatment options, conservative vs surgical upper eyelid

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Hello and thank you for your question.

If you were sitting in my office, I would recommend to you that you deal with the allergen first. I would not want to touch your eyelids, surgically or non-surgically, as this is not your 'normal'.

I wish you well and hope things settle for you quickly.


Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Treatment options, conservative vs surgical , for upper eyelid wrinkle after 2 (1 week) episodes of eyelid edema?

+1
If after 6 months this issue still bothers you than seek in person opinions. But as for now wait and avoid the allergen.....

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Eyelid wrinkle after swelling from topical dermatitis

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I certainly would give your eyelids time to heal and wait to see how the eyelid looks after 1 or 2 years once you no longer have allergic symptoms.  You are young and and important question is how the wrinkling looks when you're looking straight ahead.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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Upper eyelid edema

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You may have an allergic dermatitis which will cause swelling.  Your lid still looks a bit dry so it may not have cleared up completely.  If it was an allergy due to a specific product or something in the environment, you would normally see this on both sides. At this point I would keep the lid well lubricated.  You are young, and even if the skin has been stretched, it may go back to normal over the next few weeks.     

John J. Martin, Jr., MD
Coral Gables Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

You did not provide the critical photo to help answer this question.

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Eyes open and looking level and straight ahead would be very helpful.  It is certainly possible to have an allergic dermatitis of the eyelid skin.  This can be associated with eyelid swelling.  An itchy eyelid would be a very prominent feature of this condition.  If your eyelid was not itchy, then the diagnosis would be fishy.  If you have a reoccurring allergic dermatitis, see an allergist and figure out what you are reacting to.  These conditions do a number on the eyelid skin that will definitely bum you out.  Surgery would not be appropriate if you have an active dermatitis.  

On the other hand, if there is no itchiness, then the diagnosis is suspect.   A heavy eyelid would be consistent with ptosis and it might very well be that this is actually your issue.  Consider seeing an oculoplastic surgeon to assess what is going on.  The American Society for Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery maintains a geographic directory that can assist you to find a highly qualified eyelid plastic surgeon in your area (ASOPRS dot org).  Please remember that you look pretty damn good and it is hard to improve on perfection so proceed cautiously.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Need for eyelid surgery

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You should not consider any eyelid surgery until your allergy/inflammation problem totally settles down.  This may take several weeks/months.  Then consult a board certified plastic surgeon  who will examine both your eyes and recommend whether you would benefit from surgery.

John M. Griffin, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

No indication for blepharoplasty due to contact dermatitis of the lids.

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Is long as there is active inflammation contact dermatitis is no time to have eyelid surgery. When the swelling is completely resolved should there be redundant skin then this operation would be considered.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.