Best Treatment For Varicose Veins?

I'm Only 14 And I'm Starting To Have Varicose Veins,My Mother And My Grandfather Have Had Varicose Veins,Is There Anything That I Could Do To Treat Those Veins And Prevent Them From Spreading All Over My Legs?

Doctor Answers (4)

Varicose veins in teenagers and children - Early treatment for veins

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Teenage varicose veins are rare but can be caused by a strong genetic link.  An ultrasound will help you determine the nature of the veins in your legs. 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Venous evaluation with reflux venous ultrasound.

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The most common factor making people susceptible to varicose veins is hereditary and the most common reason for developing varicose veins is weakening(leaking) of the valves in the veins.  You cannot do anything about your genes but you can and should see a vein specialist and have a venous reflux ultrasound to evaluate the status of your vein valves then you could make a decision as to how to treat your veins.  For a short term solution, you should stay trim, exercise and wear knee length supp hose.

John Landi, MD
Naples General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Best Treatment for Varicose Veins

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One can never generalize and say that there is one  "best treatment" for varicose veins, as the best treatment is always going to depend on the individual and the particular anatomic problem that is going on within the leg veins of that individual.  Although many newer therapies have become available over the past couple of decades, everyone is not a candidate for the newer or most modern procedures due to the limits of the technology and what is is able to treat. 

The first step in determining what the best treatment is for you is to visit a vein specialist and have him examine you to determine if you have "venous reflux disease".  This condition is the most common cause of varicose veins and is typically diagnosed by an ultrasound.  If you have this disease, the valves inside your leg veins are faulty, and depending on which vein(s) are involved, you may be a candidate for one of the newer and less invasive treatments such as Endovenous Laser Therapy (EVLT) or radiofrequency vein ablation (VNUS or Venefit procedure).  If you have venous reflux disease, but are not a candidate for one of these procedure because of your anatomy, you still may be a candidate for another minimally invasive treatment known as ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy.  Some patients are not candidates for any of these newer treatment and may require surgery, such as phlebectomy or vein stripping.  Since so many different treatments are available, and the treatments are so individualized for each patient, it is critical that you are evaluated by a vein specialist that can offer all of the treatment and come up with a treatment plant that is best for you specifically.

 

In term of prevention of spread of the disease, the earlier you get treated the better, as often the condition is curative and the longer that you wait the more the disease spreads and the harder it is to treat.  The other thing that you can do is to wear compression stockings, maintain an normal weight, and exercise regularly.  All of these things have been shown to help with vein health.

 

I hope that you found this information useful.

Joel Gotvald, MD, FACS
Austin General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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Best Treatment For Varicose Veins

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Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, this problem can be inherited. You want to take preventative measures. Wear support hose,  avoid squatting down any more than you have to, avoid crossing your legs, and keep weight in an acceptable range, and your blood pressure in the normal range as you get older, and hope you fare better than your relatives.   I hope this helps.

Sonia Badreshia-Bansal, MD
Bay Area Dermatologist
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.